Sunday, November 30, 2014

2014-11-29 (Sa) Arduino Laser Tag

Not a particularly busy day because I was packing for Chicago. My plan was to pack up the screen, Arduino, and the programming cable so I could work on this out of town.

Enough background.
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The second screen was soldered to the second 3.3V Arduino Pro Mini. Wires were also installed for a trigger switch.

 Screen, Arduino, and cheat sheet

Extra terminals for power and ground
 
To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks into more detail
  • Build second vest mount
  • Build another tagger with a long gray barrel
  • Make instructions for all parts
 
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

2014-11-28 (F) Switchable Voltage Serial Adapter COMPLETED

There are two different Arduino boards used in the Arduino Laser Tag project one of which is 5V and the other is 3.3V. The previous solution was to use two different adapter boards which were inexpensive. Unfortunately these were knock-off chips which were not supported by modern drivers so a genuine FTDI chip was ordered from a reputable retailer but was five times more expensive than either of the previously purchased boards. Instead of buying two a switch was installed to switch between the voltages.

Enough background
----------

A USB<->Serial adapter was purchased from Sparkfun.com in order to get a genuine FTDI chip usable with modern drivers. Imitation chips often fail to install FTDI drivers. The adapter was selectable between 3.3V and 5V by creating a solder bridge between two of three solder pads. The default was 5V so a solder trace had to be cut and was done with a snap-blade knife.

 Severed trace between common pad and 5V pad

Snap knife

A single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switch was made from a (DPDT) switch by cutting away the pins from one of the poles. This was only done to make space for wire bending. Any SPDT switch with maintained contacts could be used. Three scrapped ethernet wires were salvaged cut, stripped, tinned and soldered to the switch pins. The wire, 26AWG, was too large to fit on the solder pads so smaller 30AWG (???) enameled magnet wire was selected. The ends were scraped to remove the enamel and soldered to the switch. Pieces of shrink tube where used to cover exposed parts of the wire. The other ends were soldered to the voltage selector pads on the board. The common pin of the switch went to the common voltage selector pad and the other switch leads went to the other pads on the board. It tested well on a 3.3V Arduino and drivers installed automatically.

 Leads cut from switch

 Two wire diameters next to one another

Enameled wires soldered to board

Switch bent around and zip tied to board

Board appearing in device manager


Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, November 28, 2014

2014-11-27 (W) VU KickStarter

Patterns for laser etching were discussed with Marissa Sundquist for covering the visor's body. The pattern are meant to convey a sense of style and add privacy without paint or finishes. The patterns will be etched during the cutting process.

The create pattern was shared with Marissa. A second pattern was drafted and put onto the outline of a visor. Swatches were made of each pattern. The most difficult part was making all the pattern lines stop at the edge of the outline.

Pattern 1

Pattern 2



The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-25 (Tu)

Thursday, November 27, 2014

2014-11-26 (W) Holiday Nachos COMPLETED

A year ago I made a recipe about nachos of another variety.

My old video about Engineer Nachos 

A couple weeks ago I was helping my mom make bite-size caramel apple (toffee apple) appetizers. The idea is to use a melon baller to scoop out spheres of apples then coat them in melted caramel from a double-boiler. Great. Except caramel doesn't stick to cut apples which are wet. So the appetizers didn't turn out well. While helping I had the idea to use red and green apple slices arranged like tortilla chips and drizzled with dipping caramel sauce like salsa. The result was supposed to be a plate of holiday nachos.

My sister is a cake decorator in Colorado who just had surgery so she can't decorate. I guess her restlessness infected me to make this.

Enough background.
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Ingredients:

  • Red apple
  • Green apple of comparable size
  • Caramel sauce
  • Lemon juice

Special tools:

  • #5 round frosting tip
  • Decorating bag for tip
Steps:
  1. Cut apples into eights or sixteenths depending on size. Remove core. An apple slicer/corer can be used.
  2. Coat apple slices in lemon juice. Spray, sprinkle or toss in a bowl.
  3. Arrange slices on plate.
  4. Cut tip from decorating bag, if disposable, insert frosting tip, and fill with caramel.
  5. Apply caramel liberally.
Don't use a blue plate.

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Now, with pictures.

Cut apples into eights or sixteenths depending on size. Remove core. An apple slicer/corer can be used.


Coat apple slices in lemon juice. Spray, sprinkle or toss in a bowl.

Arrange slices on plate.

Cut tip (15mm) from decorating bag, if disposable, insert frosting tip, and fill with caramel.

Apply caramel liberally.

This is equally tasty

Journal Page / Recipe

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-25 (Tu)

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

2014-11-25 (Tu) Arduino Laser Tag

The orange enclosure was measured for drilling on the bottom. The first enclosure had holes at the front and back but the orange has a single hole which will make it the front or barrel end. A 1/2" (12mm) hole was drilled for the switch and a 5/16" hole was drilled for the handle. After the holes were drilled it became apparent they were drilled in the wrong positions.  New holes were drilled with the correct orientation.

The first incorrect hole

To precisely arrange the four holes for the anti-rotation pegs on the handle the metal portion of the tape dispenser was placed on the enclosure facing the same direction as the handle and the holes were marked with a permanent marker. The holes were drilled to 7/32" (7mm). The handle fit well and the switch was operable.

Bolt for handle and switch

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks into more detail
  • Build vest mounts
  • Build another tagger with a long gray barrel
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-22 (Sa)

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

2014-11-24 (M) Arduino Laser Tag

Parts for the vest unit were arranged. The terminals strip was replaced with a model which has quick-disconnect terminals as well as screw terminals. 16AWG (American Wire Gauge) wires with quick-disconnect ends were made with a terminal crimper. A scratch awl marked the hole locations for the terminals strip and enclosure. Short wood screws held the components in place. A small notch was cut from the back of the enclosure to allow wires to pass from the enclosure to the terminal strip. 2 1/2" (65mm) countersunk bolts were inserted through the wood platform and tightened to the surface. Additional nuts suspended a polycarbonate sheet above the enclosure, terminal strip, and battery.

Parts arranged

Holes marked with scratch awl

Components mounted on black wood panel 

Notch cut in back of enclosure

Polycarbonate covered enclosure

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks into more detail
  • Build vest mounts
  • Build another tagger with a long gray barrel
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-22 (Sa)

Monday, November 24, 2014

2014-11-23 (Su) Arduino Laser Tag


Most of the evening was actually spent trying to make a 3D model of the laser tag cheater hat.

Enough background
----------

Materials for two more vests were purchased from a local military surplus store. A green pistol harness was purchased but showed more signs of wear than the first black one. The second vest was a new vest cover and tactical belt had a rugged feel but was more than four times as expensive. The vests were assembled.


Second inexpensive vest

Tactical vest cover and tactical belt

Each vest was photographed from from and back then the pictures were combined into a single image and the price was added. Another opinion will be gotten from Joe Robertson but he will likely own his personal set so he can choose his own hardware.


Y-Style suspenders with thrift store belt
Tactical vest cover and tactical belt

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks into more detail
  • Build vest mounts
  • Build another tagger with a long gray barrel
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-21 (F)

Sunday, November 23, 2014

2014-11-22 (Sa) Arduino Laser Tag

The tape was peeled from the painted plastic and came away cleanly. There was concern the paint would not from a clean edge since the paint was allowed to dry with the tape in place. The paint was still tacky to the touch but was not affected by light contact.

Clear window in the paint job

A second screen arrived by mail. The header pins were removed by clipping the plastic between each one then prying the pin out while applying heat from a soldering iron. Wires from an ethernet cable were salvaged for the first eight wires which were soldered in in place of the header pins. A spare wire took the place of the ninth connection.

 Headerless screen and salvaged wires

Wires soldered in place

Double-sided foam tape was applied to the screen PCB and trimmed. A second layer of tape was applied to build up the thickness beyond the height of the actual screen. The screen was stuck to the painted plastic so the screen was right-side-up and lined up with the clear window.

 Tape applied to screen PCB

Two layers of tape
Screen behind window

Glue was applied to the face of an RJ11 socket which was placed behind the 1/2" (13mm) hole so the port was accessible through the hole. The glue seemed to dissolve the paint which had not fully dried. The painted side had been placed on the inside of the clear plastic to keep it from being scratched away. The tagger will still be prone to this cosmetic damage but the clear plastic would expose the electronics while the rest of the device has color PVC underneath.

 RJ11 socket glued from back

Everything held neatly in place

Paint distorted by glue

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Build vests
  • Build another tagger
  • Make instructions for all parts
 Journal Page 1

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-20 (Th)

Saturday, November 22, 2014

2014-11-21 (F) Arduino Laser Tag

A draft was made with the measurements of the screen and breakout board. The intention was to tape the cutout to the plastic before painting so a window would remain free of paint. Double-sided tape was not available so electrical tape pieces were cut into the screen's dimensions and put on the plastic over the screen area. Paint was applied to the tape side while the other side remained covered in its shipping tape. The paint was allowed to dry overnight in a heated garage.

 Drawing under plastic sheet

Tape covering screen area
Painted plastic covers

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Build vests
  • Build another tagger
  • Make instructions for all parts


Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-19 (W)