Wednesday, December 31, 2014

2014-12-30 (Tu) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

Scrap wire was harvested to make harnesses for three more switches. Rather than soldering the wires to female headers like the first switch they were all soldered directly to the proto board. This will reduce the change of losing a connection later. The other ends of the wires were each given quick disconnect crimp connectors. Scraps of four-conductor phone wire were cut for the rest of the NeoPixels but not soldered yet.

 Bottom of proto board and stripped wires

Wires with crimped ends
 
Wires cut for NeoPixels

An IR receiver and socket were added to pin 9 but no code is being written for this version of the device. The IR receiver is being considered as a future upgrade for switching modes rather than the reed switch.

Simple RGB controllers were researched as an alternative for a lower cost version of the Color/Touch. Rather than individually addressable lights like the NeoPixels the inexpensive version would use RGB strings and an inexpensive commercially available controller. One meter of lights and a controller were ordered.


To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    2. Solder three more switches
    3. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    4. Solder terminals for accepting power 9V battery
    5. Add IR receiver socket
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    2. Immediately play sound at new mode if appropriate
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Drill frame for wires
  5. Install switches
  6. Install light hoods
  7. Install electronics
  8. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets
  9. Research inexpensive RGB controller for non-addressable LEDs
  10. Put code online
  11. Draft schematics
  12. Create instructions for project

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

2014-12-29 (M) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

The spectrum function which changes the desired color of a light based on the address and a color value from 0 to 767 was revised for the third day in a row. The function was the core of the device's ability to change colors in all modes except mode 0 were a random color fades to off which each button press. The other random mode, mode 1, used the spectrum to generate colors which stayed lit but since the colors were expected to be randomized it was never checked for accuracy.

The rest of the modes described yesterday were programmed. This was done in large by looking at the starting presentation written earlier and adding to the spectrum value at a given light. The code will be made available online soon.

A video was made with a time lapse phone app which took a picture every second then compiled the photos into a movie. The video was made of the Demo Mode so the lights change every two seconds without input from the user.

Demo mode time lapse


To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    2. Solder three more switches
    3. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    4. Solder terminals for accepting power from source
    5. Add IR receiver socket
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Create mode to rotate primary colors & white
    2. Create mode to change all lights when any switch is pressed
    3. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    4. Immediately play sound at new mode if appropriate
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Drill frame for wires
  5. Install switches
  6. Install light hoods
  7. Install electronics
  8. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets
  9. Research inexpensive RGB controller for non-addressable LEDs
  10. Put code online
  11. Create instructions for project
 
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Monday, December 29, 2014

2014-12-28 (Su) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

The list of modes was updated to include seven modes instead of the previous three.

     0 -  Random color which fades.
     1 -  Random color from spectrum().
     2 -  Cycle through basic colors.
     3 -  Each light is a different basic color.
     4 -  Like mode 2 but more colors which change more drastically.
     5 -  Whole device is a circular rainbow.
     6 -  Demo mode. Random colors. No switch input.

All the modes were given dedicated functions in the program and the first presentation was defined. When the mode is switched via the reed switch the whole device sets the lights as appropriate. With the first presentation now defined the transitioning of colors should be apparent for some of the modes.

To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    2. Solder three more switches
    3. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    4. Solder terminals for accepting power from source
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Create mode to rotate primary colors & white
    2. Create mode to change all lights when any switch is pressed
    3. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    4. Write digital input code for reed switch to change modes 
      1. Immediately shows first pattern of scheme when switched
      2. Immediately plays sound if appropriate
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Drill frame for wires
  5. Install switches
  6. Install light hoods
  7. Install electronics
  8. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Sunday, December 28, 2014

2014-12-27 (Sa) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

The code for transitioning colors was commented out and rewritten. The rewrite relied on the concept of how it should work rather than the previously written code. The old code was written during a sleep-deprived coding session but laid the work for this revision which worked immediately.

A reed switch was soldered to a two conductor cable, sealed with heat-shrink tubing then the other end of the cable was soldered to the proto-board. The code was modified to change modes from signals on the reed switch rather than a potentiometer. The potentiometer could be used during testing  to change the transition speed. The reed switch uses the bounce2 library like the other switches so modes are not switched inadvertently.

 Reed switch soldered to proto-board

Reed switch covered in heat shrink tubing

Demonstrating reed switch and transitions

To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder reed switch
    2. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    3. Solder three more switches
    4. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    5. Solder terminals for accepting power from source
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Add transitioning sequence which looks at current and intended color then transitions if necessary
    2. Create mode to rotate primary colors & white
    3. Create mode to change all lights when any switch is pressedW
    4. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    5. Write digital input code for reed switch to change modes 
      1. Eliminate pots
      2. Immediately shows first pattern of scheme when switched
      3. Immediately plays sound if appropriate
      4. Use bounce2 library
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Install switches
  5. Install light hoods
  6. Install electronics
  7. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, December 27, 2014

2014-12-26 (F) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

A list was made with all the color schemes based on notes written in Chicago. Those notes focused on patterns and transitions more than color schemes so there are currently three color schemes:

  • Random
  • Rainbow
  • Wide spectrum
The first method of random color changing was done by assigning variables to each light randomly but a spectrum function was added which has a predefined range for each light based on a scale of 0-765 (3 x 255). The function wrote the desired color to the array without affecting the current color.

A transition function was started which looks at each light and compares the current color to the desired color. If there is a difference the current color is moved closer to the desired color incrementally.  A video was made to show the start-up sequence and the problem with the transition function which causes the lights to flicker uncontrollably.

Start-up sequence and malfunctioning transition


To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder reed switch
    2. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    3. Solder three more switches
    4. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    5. Solder terminals for accepting power from source
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Make master list of all modes
    2. Add three more variables for each color to hold the color it should transition to
    3. Write spectrum function to change desired color based on 0-765 input
    4. Add transitioning sequence which looks at current and intended color then transitions if necessary
    5. Create mode to rotate primary colors & white
    6. Create mode to change all lights when any switch is pressedW
    7. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    8. Write digital input code for reed switch to change modes 
      1. Eliminate pots
      2. Immediately shows first pattern of scheme when switched
      3. Immediately plays sound if appropriate
      4. Use bounce2 library
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Install switches
  5. Install light hoods
  6. Install electronics
  7. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, December 26, 2014

2014-12-25 (Th) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

The list of improvements and divided tasks was started by adding two registers to each light. These were going to serve as a location of pattern-specific numbers and a bit to go HIGH when transitioning. (*edit - After writing the paper journal but before typing it occurred to me that it would make more sense to have a total of six registers; three for current color and three for desired color. The program could compare the registers to see if a color change is necessary. This would eliminate a lot of instances where the code can falter.)

A start-up sequence was added which ramps up each color in turn then shuts off the lights. This is done to test that each emitter is working properly.

To do:
  1. Build electronics
    1. Solder reed switch
    2. Solder remaining NeoPixels
    3. Solder three more switches
    4. Solder power terminals for transferring power
    5. Solder terminals for accepting power from source
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Make master list of all modes
    2. Add start-up sequence
    3. Add numberOfPanels and numberOfLights (panels x 4) variables
    4. Add three more variables for each color to hold the color it should transition to
    5. Add transitioning sequence which looks at current and intended color then transitions if necessary
    6. Create mode to rotate primary colors & white
    7. Create mode to change all lights when any switch is pressedW
    8. Write digital output code for one or two sounds
    9. Write digital input code for reed switch to change modes 
      1. Eliminate pots
      2. Immediately shows first pattern of scheme when switched
      3. Immediately plays sound if appropriate
      4. Use bounce2 library
  3. Cut and drill polycarbonate sheet
  4. Install switches
  5. Install light hoods
  6. Install electronics
  7. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Thursday, December 25, 2014

2014-12-24 (W) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

Brainstorming and planning was done while away from the apartment. A page was written which broke down the asks for programming and introduced logical additions to the program such as a start-up sequence which illuminates each color of each NeoPixel. Another addition will be a reed switch which will be used to switch modes. This method of mode switching will replace the three potentiometers since the reed switch can be activated from outside the enclosure and are inexpensive devices which require minimal programming. The programming is even easier since the Bounce2 library has already been integrated.

Page of notes

A non-volatile recording module was sourced which will give the Color/Touch audible feedback for the user. A simple and short sound will be recorded and permanently stored. The sound module was $5 from a US eBay seller.


To do:
  1. Build electronics
  2. Program Arduino
    1. Break up tasks
    2. Sketch pseudo-code
  3. Buy, drill, and cut polycarbonate sheet
  4. Install switches
  5. Install light hoods
  6. Install electronics
  7. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

2014-12-34 (Tu) Color/Touch Sensory Panel & Arduino Laser Tag

A new USB <-> Serial TTL adapter arrived for programming the Arduino Pro Minis used in the Laser Tag and Color/Touch projects. Other inexpensive adapter boards use imitation FTDI chips which no longer work with FTDI drivers. This adapter board uses a CP2102 chip by Silicone Labs. The installation was not plug-and-play. A driver had to be downloaded from their website but it was easy to find and installed for Mac and PC without problems then ran properly when putting code into the Arduino and even supported the software reset which didn't work on the last FTDI chip.

 Successfully connected to a PC

Successfully connected to a Mac

Journal Page

The Laser Tag and Color/Touch project posts can be viewed by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-12-14 (Su)

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

2014-12-22 (M) Arduino Laser Tag

An emitter tube was drafted in OpenSCAD to hold a 38mm lens 45mm from an LED. The emitter tube was also sized so it could be mounted into a standard weaver rail scope mount. The model was printed.
Virtual view 1

Virtual view 2

Virtual view 3


Printed part view 1 

Printed part view 2

Printed part view 3

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks into more detail
  • Build second vest mount
  • Build another tagger with a long gray barrel
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-12-14 (Su)

Monday, December 22, 2014

Today I am in Texas for work so my usual computers are 1,100 miles away. I am not going to type up the hand written journal so apologies for my handwriting.








Sunday, December 21, 2014

2014-12-20 (Sa) Charged: DesertIrish

The morning after Dawson arrived in Minnesota he restored the truck purchased for Charley. While writing, the detail about avoiding the odometer was forgotten so the story followed that Dawson also forgot the detail. With an odometer reading less than the purchased distance the truck cannot be sold. Dawson presumes this will not upset Charley and their father agrees. When Dawson wakes up after the ordeal he found his father, Bud, and Heather at the house. Heather was unusually chipper and Bud invited her to share in cooking which was out of character for him.

The plan with her mood and Bud's reaction was to show how she is currently like Dawson's mother. Bud will reveal that he felt at ease around her because she reminded him so much of his errant wife. Heather's mood will not last since it is an effect of over the counter pain medication.

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power"
Total word count: 8 406 + 60 228 + 83 897 152 531 words

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.
2014-12-19 (F)

Saturday, December 20, 2014

2014-12-19 (F) Charged: DesertIrish

Heather and Dawson landed in Minnesota and were picked up by Charley. Heather spread her bad mood and finally sequestered herself at a hotel. Dawson agreed to buy Charley a car and he picked out an old truck. Back home Dawson had a long conversation with his father about family. He admits he knew about Dawson's plan for revenge and won't stop him but he makes Dawson promise to protect his siblings.

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power"
Total word count: 7 698 + 60 228 + 83 897 = 151 823 words


Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.
2014-12-18 (Th)

Friday, December 19, 2014

2014-12-18 (Th) Charged: DesertIrish

I hadn't written anything for a month and I guess it kind of built up. I was working on the Color/Touch project and I was pure scatterbrain. Every time I put a tool down I lost it. Every time I drilled a hole it was in the wrong place. Every time I did touched a tool I broke something. My long list of things to do that evening was half completed and everything took longer than I wanted. I cut my losses and went to my apartment.

The thought of getting back to this story was the most appealing thing and catching up on the story was refreshing and I couldn't wait to move the story along. It was like reverse writer's block. Every character sounded right. Every scenario had a clear resolution. I was glad to be writing again.

Enough background.
----------

After a month the story had to be reread. Some minor additions and edits in the meantime bolstered the word count for the day. While rereading a few edits were made but only minor things like word choice.

The story continued quickly, mostly in exposition in order to move everyone from North Carolina to Minnesota. Jason took The Flying Machine and left the group. Everyone split up for the trip. Shana challenged the brothers Clary, Motor and Head, to a race to Chicago. Head too the challenge personally. This was Shana's attempt to get cohesion in the group.

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power"
Total word count: 5 230 + 60 228 + 83 897 = 149 355 words

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.
2014-12-17

Thursday, December 18, 2014

2014-12-17 (W) Color/Touch Sensory Panel

Holes were marked on the inside of the frame for mounting the 3D printed light hoods. The hoods were suspended a specific distance above the bottom by placing a scrap of wood under a hood before marking the hole positions with a marker. The marks were started with a scratch awl. When the first hood was installed the screw broke the support so it was removed. Adhesives will likely be used to install the plastic hoods. Some flaws were also seen in the design which would make the hoods difficult to install easily.

 Marking hole positions

Starting holes with a short scratch awl
Broken hood

A piece of scrap wood with a white finish was trimmed to fit inside half of the frame. A section was marked off then cut away with a band saw. Angle brackets were positioned on the scrap wood and holes were marked and drilled. The frame's cross-member was removed so holes could be drilled and screws could be installed. This would serve as a platform for holding the lights not mounted on printed light hoods.

 Marking the position for the bracket

Cutting wood away from bracket
Platform and cross-member

To do:
  1. Build all light hoods
  2. Build electronics
  3. Program Arduino
    1. Break up tasks
    2. Sketch pseudo-code
  4. Buy, drill, and cut polycarbonate sheet
  5. Install switches
  6. Install light hoods
  7. Install electronics
  8. Install polycarbonate and light diffuser sheets

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.