Thursday, April 30, 2015

2015-04-29 (W) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Currently the 9V power connector on the project is a pair of wires soldered to the Arduino with the 9V connector on the other end. Replacing this connector was a semi-enclosed 9V holder which has a clip to hold the battery in place. The new battery holder has three mounting holes which were measured yesterday. A shortcut was taken by salvaging an old 3D printed lid and drilling pilot holes in the top for three screws. Instead of printing a new enclosure an older one was salvaged as well and a 3.5mm headphone socket was glued in the cutout space which will be the connector for the 5V coil. Once the project is soldered and the long screws are trimmed the enclosure will be complete.

9V holder screwed to a lid
 
Underside of lid
 
Headphone socket glued in place

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Build coil mount
  • Solder coil
  • Investigate the tone() function as a better programming method
  • Write instructions
    • Materials list
    • Tools list
    • Collect pictures

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

2015-04-28 (Tu) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Measurements were taken from a 9V battery holder which has a built-in clip. This clip will attach to the back of the existing enclosure and provide power while a 3.5mm headphone socket will send a signal to the 5V relay coil. A second enclosure will not be necessary. Instead of printing a second lid the current lid may simply be drilled with the 9V battery holder as a template.

Measurements taken from 9V battery holder

Diagram of 9V battery holder

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Build coil mount
  • Investigate the tone() function as a better programming method
  • Redesign enclosure
  • Write instructions
    • Materials list
    • Tools list
    • Collect pictures

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

2015-04-27 (M) Cyborg Distance Sensor

The reclaimed coil from a 5V relay was soldered to the Arduino with blue and yellow wires. This replaced the 3.5mm headphone socket. A 9V battery terminal was soldered to the RAW and GND for power. Programming was done to simply use the potentiometer as a frequency selector. The distance sensing routine was left intact but had no direct effect on the delay, rather it was intended to provide the expected interference with an otherwise clean operation. The distance sensing routine incorporates a small delay. Further testing will be done to determine if this was the best choice for programming methods.

Equipment set up for testing with a 9V, potentiometer and coil

After the unit was assembled for testing the timing was fine tuned by sweeping the potentiometer back and forth to find sensible frequencies for the upper and lower bounds. The frequencies were 5Hz to 500Hz. The next step may be to test if logarithmic frequency progression is more effective than a linearly increasing progression. Logarithmic progression is necessary for humans to differentiate sound when the frequency being differentiated is relatively large. After testing the coil was sealed in epoxy to prevent damage.

 Covering coil in epoxy

Dried epoxy covered coil

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Make coil portable
  • Write program to sweep delay timer for 1/ƒ
  • Find upper and lower delay thresholds
  • Reprogram with new settings
  • Build coil mount
  • Investigate the tone() function as a better programming method
  • Redesign enclosure
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions
    • Materials list
    • Tools list
    • Collect pictures

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Monday, April 27, 2015

2015-04-26 (Su) Cyborg Distance Sensor

In an attempt to extract a coil from a 5V relay two more relays, identical to the previous one, were cut open. While removing the unnecessary pins, contacts, and wires the pins for the coil were also removed which unfortunately rendered the coil useless. Maybe the coil could have been salvaged but the effort would have been greater than the reward. The relays used were stocked items but readily available.

Deconstructed relay
Clipped coil wires

A second relay was disassembled and care was taken to avoid cutting the posts away but some of the coil wires were inadvertently cut when removing some of the plastic shell. Rather than cut into the original relay used to switch the battery supply a different model of relay was taken from stock. This relay had a much different configuration for its coil which made deconstruction much simpler. The unnecessary pins were easily cut away leaving a 5V electromagnet. This coil will either be hooked to a 3.5mm headphone sock or wired to a 3.5mm headphone wire. The item will likely be encased in epoxy to keep it from damage.

Damaged coil

 New relay next to shell

Three coils

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Extract 5V coil from relay
  • Make coil portable
  • Write program to sweep delay timer for 1/ƒ
  • Find upper and lower delay thresholds
  • Reprogram with new settings
  • Build coil mount
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-26 (Su)

Sunday, April 26, 2015

2015-04-25 (Sa) Cryonics Roundtable Discussion

On Saturday I attended a roundtable MeetUp with the Twin Cities Plus group. The subject of the discussion was cryonics. Before the gathering I didn't know the difference between cryonics and cryogenics. 
Cryogenics is the study of the production and behaviour of materials at very low temperatures (below −150 °C, −238 °F or 123 K).
Cryonics is the low-temperature preservation of animals and humans who cannot be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that healing and resuscitation may be possible in the future. 
To begin we watch a video tour of the Cryonics Institute est 1972. Following the video was a video conference call with Mr. Dennis Kowalski the president of the Cryonics Institute.

Mr. Kowalski is a volunteer firefighter and Nationally Registered EMT-Paramedic. His knowledge of cryonics was impressive but his frankness about the procedure was the most impressive. He admitted early on that there is no reliable way to store a person cryonically and revive them. Even organs have not been able to be completely revived after reaching liquid nitrogen temperature.

The video explains candidly how the vitrification process is performed. The video is not graphic but very sensitive people may find the discussion difficult to accept. Probably not the people who read this blog though. Dennis Kowalski's frankness did not abate when he admitted there is damage done by the vitrification process and the extent is unknown from patient to patient.

By the end the most impressive thing Dennis Kowalski said was cryonics was an "ambulance to the future." And there may not be a hospital there. But he added that a person who is buried or cremated has a zero percent chance arriving but a cryonic's patient has a greater-than-zero chance.

My opinion of cryonics doesn't exist. Simply knowing the technology exists is exciting. Sort of. The science of preserving someone exists but reviving them from this particular process hasn't been proving. If I were to find out that my expected lifespan could be measured in a small day planner I would probably have a very different view on cryonics.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-25 (Sa)

Saturday, April 25, 2015

2015-04-24 (F) Weekly Summary

A lot of time was wasted dealing with broken or non-working hardware. This caused holdups because programming couldn't be done properly and previously soldered work had to be cut apart, cleaned, and resoldered. Two different programmable boards were tried and the third time was indeed the charm.
Soldered board on top with scrapped board behind it

The first board selected for this project was a Trinket which is an Arduino compatible board which uses the ATTiny85 chip. This chip doesn't require a USB ↔ Serial converter which is nice but doesn't support Serial.print statements which makes debugging more difficult. This board failed to take a program despite attempts to program it from several computers. This was replaced with a Arduino Pro Mini. This board had been pulled out of a different project and may have been faulty before soldering. Also failed to work. The last board to be installed was a brand new Arduino Mini Pro which accepted a program immediately.

The Cyborg Distance Sensor is divided into two parts. The first part, described above is the Sensing + Processing module which houses the ultrasonic distance sensor and the Arduino. Power + Stimulation is handled by the second module which is currently a pair of 3.5mm headphone sockets with a 5V relay. An enclosure was drafted for these components but was done incorrectly. After sensing the relay with my own finger magnet it was decided to change direction and simply use the 5V relay coil to stimulate an implanted magnet. A 23A battery, which is a small 12volt battery, had been selected but the short life and high cost of the battery prompted me to change to a 9V battery version.


Bare module connected with headphone cable

After the hardware issues had been resolved the program was tested and functioned but not ideally. To easily change variables a potentiometer was soldered to an analog input on the Arduino. An analog input could be read periodically to update numbers which would otherwise be static. No definite numbers were found which consistently provided reliable results. Since the relay will be stripped down to the coil any further debugging has been delayed until the hardware can be made to match the specifications.

Potentiometer soldered to board for debugging

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.





This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, April 24, 2015

2015-04-23 (Th) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Programming for the distance sensor was modified to use a variable as a reference point when calculating output frequency. In other words the amount of chattering from the relay could vary a lot when something is near or far but that variance could be more than a human can perceive. Making the variance too small would mean the user can't tell the difference between the near and far frequencies. A potentiometer was soldered to the analog0 input of the Arduino to change the set points to try to find a usable window. This was unsuccessful since the readings were difficult to control but vibration was sensed.

Code revision

Potentiometer soldered to board

The problem with the battery seemed to be a lack of power. An old battery had been used for testing so when a fresh battery replace it the relay would operate as expected. The 23A batteries do not seem to provide adequate power for a microcontroller and a relay. While testing the relay's solenoid could be felt with a finger magnet independently of the mechanical chattering. A 5V coil may be sufficient for stimulation without the need for switching a higher voltage. The next design in this project will be changing to a standard 9V battery power supply and a 5V coil from a relay for the stimulation. The Power + Stimulation enclosure was corrected but will not be printed at this time.

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Correct enclosure model
  • Determine why battery doesn't work
  • Extract 5V coil from relay
  • Write program to sweep delay timer for 1/ƒ
  • Find upper and lower delay thresholds
  • Reprogram with new settings
  • Build coil mount
  • Set frequency. Potentiometer
  • Construct coil
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-23 (Th)

Thursday, April 23, 2015

2015-04-22 (W) Cyborg Distance Sensor

The enclosure for the Power + Stimulation module was backwards so the headphone connector holes were not aligned properly. A new enclosure will be designed and printed.

After trying to install two faulty Arduino boards a brand new board Pro Mini was installed when it arrived in the mail early. Wires from the old board were transferred one at a time without issue. The Arduino and distance sensor were held close by soldering wires directly from one board to the next as was done with the last board.

 Soldered boards with scrapped boards in the background

With both boards soldered together the Arduino was programmed through an ordinary USB ↔ serial adapter. During troubleshooting for the previous boards the Arduino software was updated and the new software had no trouble programming this board.

To test the relay output a simple program was written which simply chattered the relay and this was done easily with the headphone cable running between each module. When the data cable was disconnected and a battery was inserted the Arduino lit up but the relay would not operate. This issue will have to be addressed.

Arduino powered by 23A battery

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Correct enclosure model
  • Determine why battery doesn't work
  • Set frequency. Potentiometer
  • Construct coil
  • Verify pin assignment in program
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-22 (W)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

2015-04-21 (Tu) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Since the Trinket would not accept programming an Arduino Mini Pro replaced it because it was in stock. This unit is unfortunately 3.3V which may cause issues with the 5V relay. Arduino Mini Pros have an onboard voltage regulator so no different wiring was necessary. Pin programming was disregarded in order to line up the GND, pin2, and pin3 from the Arduino to the ultrasonic distance sensor. The three pins happen to be in the desired order. Long wires were run through the holes of each and soldered in place before trimming them.This lead to a very small clearance. The pin assignment in the program may have to be updated.

 Disassembled Trinket version

Assembled Arduino Mini Pro version

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Construct coil
  • Verify pin assignment in program
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-20 (M)

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

2015-04-20 (M) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Measurements were taken of the Power + Stimulation components using a digital caliper. The measurements were recorded and an enclosure was modeled in OpenSCAD. Images were recorded from OpenSCAD to record the process as an animated procedure. Since the enclosure will likely be mounted to a wrist or forearm small strap holes were modeled to attach textile to later. The lid was designed with a 1mm raised center to fit inside the enclosure and hold in place without rotating. The raised center is important since only one bolt is being used to hold the lid in place.

Taking measurements

Modeling the enclosure


Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Construct coil
  • Make enclosure for Power + Stimulation portion
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-20 (M)

Monday, April 20, 2015

2015-04-19 (Su) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Another unsuccessful day was spent trying to program the Trinket. Programming was attempted on two Windows computers and a Mac. After reading tutorials and installing drivers repeatedly the decision was made to eliminate the Trinket from the project. The problem is presumably a hardware defect.

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Make enclosure for Power + Stimulation portion
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-16 (Th)

Sunday, April 19, 2015

2015-04-18 (Sa) Cyborg Distance Sensor

A schematic was drawn which uses a DPDT relay to alternate current to the stimulation coil. Parts were selected for the Power + Stimulation portion of the project. This portion is meant to hold the battery, relay, and coil. While selecting parts the idea of using a 3.5mm mono jack to connect the coil was used. Since the coil has not been made and several options exist the plug will make experimentation simple and should prevent any careless accidents from damaging the components.

Updated schematic for Power + Stimulation

Selected components for Power + Stimulation assembly

Soldered components from below

Soldered components from above

The 4xAA battery packs have switches built in so power switching was taken care of. During construction a 23A battery was decided upon instead due to it's size. A 23A battery provides 12V but is the same size as an N battery or roughly half the length of a AA battery with a slightly smaller diameter. They do not have a long life nor are they cheap but to demonstrate this project they are worth trying. Once assembled a battery was inserted to the holder and a stereo 3.5mm cord was run between the two assemblies to prove that power was being applied to the Sensor + Processing half.

23A battery holder soldered to relay and sockets
Powered components

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Assemble Power + Stimulation portion of project 
  • Make enclosure for Power + Stimulation portion
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-16 (Th)

Saturday, April 18, 2015

2015-04-17 (F) Weekly Summary

The Haptic Distance Sensor was quickly featured on Instructables. Instructions were written in a day using pictures from this blog. Instructables has drawn people to this blog more than any other place I've promoted my creations. With published instructions the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor was completed. A cyborg version similar to the Bottlense project by Grindhouse Wetware was started. This project was added to the Year 02 completed projects.


A single-day project was shown which was an OpenSCAD file which allowed a user to generate encoder wheels by simply entering a few measurements. Ideally the wheels would have also arranged themselves in an efficient order by using a second file but the arrangement was sloppy. Instead the file was released which allows a user to use ("use<encoderwheel.scad>") the file to generate single encoder wheels. This project was added to the Year 02 completed projects.


After completing the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor a similar version was started which was meant to be similar to the Bottlense project by Grindhouse Wetware. This version interacts with an implanted magnet. I have a magnet in my left ring finger and another one in my left index finger. This model was started to be able to demonstrate at Convergence 2015. I will be on a couple panels at Convergence this year. The enclosure for the Cyborg Distance Sensor was modified from the servo version. Schematics were drawn and feature a three position phone cable going between two components. The servo version relied on an external 5V battery to power everything. The cyborg version uses a coil of wire which will be excited by the power supply which may range from 6 to 16 volts. An onboard voltage regulator will supply the correct voltage to the microcontroller. The Sensing + Processing assembly was soldered but not yet programmed or tested.

Enclosure changes made from the servo version to the cyborg version

Schematic for Sensing + Processing

Schematic for Power + Stimulation

Soldered assembly for Sensing + Processing

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.




This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.