Sunday, May 31, 2015

2015-05-30 (Sa) Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

One-liter bottles were gathered to find the best method for soda bottle deconstruction. A razor saw, razor knife and scissors were used. The first method was to make cuts down the side of the bottle with a razor. Instead of relying on lines drawn with a marker the seams in the bottle were followed. These seams were not noticed when marker lines were drawn but are now evident. Bottle bottoms are thicker plastic than the sides so it was cut with a fine razor knife. At the nozzle end of the bottle scissors were used to shape the cut in order to make it a scoop with the nozzle intact. The first bottle was successfully bisected.

Bottles, razor knife, and razor saw

Seam on bottle highlighted

Sides of bottle cut with razor knife

Bottle cut with scissors
 
Razor saw bisecting bottom of bottle


One bisected bottle

The second bottle was bisected by cutting the thick bottom first with the hope that the structure would be easier to handle for the cutting. Cutting the bottom first was easier than cutting the sides first but after cutting apart two bottles a motorized saw will be used to cut the 2-liter bottles which will be used for the wind turbines. Learning on the 1-liter bottles was a good choice since the bottles will now be cut uniformly. Pictures of the small 1-liter bottles were made after putting the bottles into the plastic support pieces to give an idea of the desired shape.

2 bottle halves arranged to make a wind turbine

Wind turbine hanging from 5/16" (8mm) bolt

Files for Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

To do:
  • Cut and drill new bottle holders
  • Get two liter bottles
  • Construct wind turbines
  • Start testing

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-26 (Tu)

Saturday, May 30, 2015

2015-05-29 (F) Weekly Summary

This week started with a convention of makers at Minne-Faire where I demonstrated the assistive devices I've built like the distance sensors.

Panoramic shot from Minne-Faire

Programming was done for the Wind Generator Test Base. Problems arose earlier when the wrong processor was ordered. The processor was supposed to be one which could emulate a keyboard so data could be input to a spreadsheet as it was observed. Instead the processor could not do that. Instead of replacing the processor the program was modified to output data to the serial port which could be pasted into a spreadsheet without trouble. Data was generated by taking many readings in a much shorter period than would be necessary in long-term data recording. After spinning the rods and recording some manual movements the data was pasted into a spreadsheet and a graph was generated to show the validity. This completed the Wind Generator Test Base.

Serial data on left and program on right

Spreadsheet with graph

With the Wind Generator Test Base built the fun part could start. Being able to test different configurations of turbines was the goal. Building the turbines from salvaged material was the ideal but adding small changes to increase efficiency was also desirable. Necessary measurements were taken on a 2-liter bottle using a digital caliper. From the measurements a bottle mount was designed to be cut from a thick plastic sheet.

Digital caliper measurements

Pen draft of bottle holder

A complex version with adjustable spacing was considered but a variety of fixed spaced parts was considered more practical. Five sizes were drafted with the middle size being spaced so the edges of adjacent bottles would touch but not overlap. Two sizes were drafted which allow the edges of the bottles to overlap and two more sizes were drafted which puts space between the bottle edges.

All the turbine designs require bottles to be bisected lengthwise. Bisecting marks were made by filling a 1-liter bottle with warm water and pouring it into a 2-liter bottle so it was filled half way. A marker traced the water line which provided a reference line for the cutting.

1-liter of water in a clear bottle and a green 2-liter bottle

Rack used to keep bottle steady

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.





This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, May 29, 2015

2015-05-28 (Th) Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

Designs for an adjustable bottle holder were made but abandoned due to complexity. Five simple designs were drafted. Four designs were new while the middle size was a copy of the design made previously. All five designs were meant to hold bottle at various lengths from the axle to test the advantages of spacing versus space constraints. The current hypothesis is bottles spaced farther apart will provide higher torque with lower speed compare to relatively closer bottles. Results should show a speed which most closely matches the wind speed instead of being slowed by the resistance of the generator.

PDF of designs available below

A method of bisecting 2-liter bottles had been delaying the process. Cutting the bottles with a saw or razor knife shouldn't be difficult but finding a method of accurately bisecting a bottle was not forthcoming. Originally the design was to build a jig which would encompass half of the bottle and make it easy to trace the cut lines. Since this device could be deployed to remote locations a simple method was preferable and the method decided upon was to fill a 1-liter bottle with warm water, pour it into the 2-liter bottle, lay it on its side, and trace the water line. Without a 1-liter bottle the method could be recreated by filling the bottle approximately half way then checking for accuracy by looking how close the water was to half way in relation to the cap and bottom. Warm water was used because cold water could cause condensation and prevent a marker from marking the sides.

 1 liter of warm water

1 liter of warm water in a 2-liter bottle
Bottle resting on slats for stability

Seven bottles were marked up

Files for Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

To do:
  • Cut and drill new bottle holders
  • Get two liter bottles
  • Construct wind turbines
  • Start testing

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-14 (Th)

Thursday, May 28, 2015

2015-05-27 (W) Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

On 2015-05-07 (Th) plastic was cut and drilled for mounting bottles. This was posted out of order and didn't describe the process for creating the shapes. That will be done now.

Cutouts were drafted for making bottle holders out of plastic sheets. 1/4" polycarbonate was in stock and should be thin enough for attaching bottles. The paper cutouts were trimmed with scissors and the centers of the holes were punched out with a hole punch. Center marks on the circles were not long enough to extend beyond the hole punch circle so they were extended with a ruler and pen. Once the paper cutouts were prepared they were positioned on the polycarbonate sheet and traced so it could be cut. Unfortunately the drafting file was lost.

Paper drafts and plastic

Paper cutouts for bottle holders

To do:
  • Cut and drill bottle holders
  • Get two liter bottles
  • Construct wind turbines
  • Move on to testing

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-26 (Su)

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

2015-05-26 (Tu) Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests

This project is a follow-up to the Wind Generator Test Base. A single base will be used for sequentially testing different turbine designs. The tests should give an idea of which turbine designs perform best and under which conditions so comparable turbines can be tested simultaneously and therefore with identical conditions.

Enough background.
----------

A design was sketched for mounting two bottles next to one another while being supported by a 5/16" (8mm) threaded rod. The threaded rod was a standard part of the Wind Generator Test Base. The base will be less than 5mm thick to allow for it to fit between the cap and the bottle collar. With enough clearance two of the mounts could be staggered and the top pair of bottles could face perpendicular to the bottom pair to capture wind more efficiently.

Sketch of bottle holder

Two-liter soda bottles were purchased and measured. The diameter of the bottle, which will be important could not be measured directly with the digital calipers so the circumference was measured with a fiberglass tape measure.
Two-liter soda bottle
  • Circumference = 342mm
  • Diameter = 108.862mm ≈ 110mm
  • Bottle height ≈ 300mm
  • Bottle neck collar ≈ 33mm
  • Gap between collar and cap ≈ 5mm
  • Bottle thread OD = 27.78mm ≈ 28mm
  • Cap OD = 30.82mm ≈ 30.5mm
  • Cap retainer thickness = 3.97mm ≈ 4mm
Bottle measurements being taken

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-21 (Tu)

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

2015-05-25 (M) Wind Generator Test Base COMPLETED

Instead of changing microcontrollers the decision was made to use serial commands but reformat them so they can be copied from Arduino's serial terminal and pasted into a spreadsheet. A serial terminal with the ability to export a .csv file may be researched in the future. If a reading is taken every 15 seconds there would be 5,760 readings in a day which could exceed the amount of data able to be stored in a terminal window. This can be tested quickly by running very fast samples to capture 6,000 readings in minutes. Shorter sample periods may also be feasible.

Testing program on left and regular program on right

Measuring the revolutions was more difficult than expected. The first program used a while loop to halt the whole program until readings were seen on each station. Changes were made and the whole function was eliminated in favor of a function which operated transparently. With no wind turbines attached the program was tested by manually spinning posts to generate voltage and a tachometer frequency. Output was recorded in Arduino's serial terminal and graphed in a spreadsheet program.

Graphed output of manual spinning

No more revisions will be made until necessary. This phase of the wind turbine project will be considered COMPLETED. Testing for the turbines will be done in Wind Generator Turbine Design Tests. Construction of turbines will also be done there.

Files for Wind Generator Test Base:
The OpenSCAD file below is not necessary unless you want to change something
 To do:
  • Connect electrical to stations 
  • Buy Arduino or Teensy
  • Test each station 
  • Debug program
  • Go to next phase and test turbine designs

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-25 (M)

Monday, May 25, 2015

2015-05-24 (Su) Wind Generator Test Base

Since a suitable replacement for the controller could not be found the program was altered to send serial data instead of keyboard data. This was done simply by finding all the Keyboard commands and replacing them with Serial commands. Both used print commands so a find/replace worked for everything at once.

Program debugging was started. The second problem was the data registers for the voltage was meant to be float values, which are values which aren't limited to whole numbers. 1, 4, 6, 9 are all integers while 4.7, 9.25, 100.96 are all float values. When integers are rounded or truncated they lose precisions so no readings were visible.


Replacing Keyboard commands with Serial commands

Poorly formatted readout 

Properly formatted readout

There are still problems with the program. Only station five reported a voltage readout, but that readout corresponded with previously measured voltages. Unfortunately the station generating voltage was station one. A continuity test was performed and all wires showed correct connections but signals seemed weak. Since most wires are similar in distance relative readings can still be taken.

Testing continuity with a meter

Files for Wind Generator Test Base:
The OpenSCAD file below is not necessary unless you want to change something
 To do:
  • Connect electrical to stations 
  • Buy Arduino or Teensy
  • Test each station 
  • Debug program
  • Go to next phase and test turbine designs

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-24 (Su)

Sunday, May 24, 2015

2015-05-23 (Sa) Minne-Faire

This weekend is Minne-Faire at Twin Cities Maker. Minne-Faire is a chance for local geeks to come out and see what other local geeks spend their time on. Robot geeks were there, STEM education geeks were there, ballistics geeks were there, artist geeks were there and some Arduino geeks sat next to the Transhumanist table I was helping at.

For the event I got to show off my Haptic Distance Sensor and Cyborg Distance Sensor. These assistive devices could someday help vision-impaired people regain mobility. In the meantime they're a way to give enthusiasts SONAR vision.

Also on display was a copy of the e-Nable Raptor Reloaded. This mechanical hand is a 3D printed hand meant to give functionality back to people who do not have fingers but have a working wrist.

The event was a good way to talk to people and tell them about what Twin Cities Plus will be doing in the future. TC+ is a 501(c)3 charity.

 Sorry, I don't have model releases for anyone in these shots





This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

2015-05-22 (F) Weekly Summary

Construction of the Wind Generator Test Base took the whole week. Stations were built last week so this week focused on the overall structure, programming, and electrical.

A program was written for the project which was meant to control an Arduino with keyboard emulation capabilities. Unfortunately the Arduino purchased did not have that capability. A usable Arduino will have to be purchased or a workaround will be necessary. One workaround option is to use a program which can accept serial data and place it into a spreadsheet. Another option is to store all the data in a terminal program like HyperTerminal or puTTY then save the output as a comma delimited file.

Arduino program

Electronics for the project included the monitoring hardware like a reed switch which interacted with a magnet attached to the axle to get a speed reading. The reed switch will go high once per revolution so by timing how long it takes to go high twice the time per revolution can be calculated and from there the RPMs can be calculated. Also monitored was the voltage from a generator. These two signals were run to screw terminals located on the stations themselves.

Reed switch for reading revolutions

Stations wired up

The stations had to be arranged by angling them to avoid collisions with the next stations. Originally each station was going too be shorter but 24" threaded rods were an easy purchase so the stations were twisted and the base will be angled appropriately. Each station will sit vertically but the base will be angled. The option to use only three stations was abandoned. The base was mounted to my porch railing and held up during a night of high winds with no issues.

Angled stations

Base mounted to porch

Electronics for the controller side of the project were started with a clean looking arrangement of wires run to a long terminals strip from a small breadboard. The clean looking wires were quickly rearranged and a messy tangle of cheap ethernet wires were installed to run to each station. The physical construction of the Wind Generator Test Base was completed but the programming must still be done.

Controller wiring

Wiring to the stations

Fully constructed test base

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.





This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, May 22, 2015

2015-05-21 (Th) Wind Generator Test Base

A program could not be loaded into the controller since an oversight on my part lead me to purchase a controller which wouldn't work for this project. The Arduino Nano uses a USB↔TTL converter like many Arduinos I've used in this blog. This was a mistake since the project requires keyboard emulation which is not convenient or possible with many Arduinos. One board capable of this function was the Leonardo and its breadboard friendly counterpart the Micro. Anecdotally, searching for "Arduino Micro" was difficult since the term "micro" appears very often when searching for microcontrollers.

Importing serial data to a spreadsheet has been done in the past but requires a third party program. One program which may be tested is GoBetwino. If a suitable replacement board cannot be found locally options for converting serial port data will be researched. Another option is to use a second Arduino which can emulate a keyboard and use it to convert serial port data from the programmed Nano.

Files for Wind Generator Test Base:
The OpenSCAD file below is not necessary unless you want to change something
 To do:
  • Connect electrical to stations
  • Buy Arduino or Teensy
  • Test each station
  • Debug program
  • Go to next phase and test turbine designs

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-21 (Th)

Thursday, May 21, 2015

2015-05-20 (W) Wind Generator Test Base


Wiring on the terminal strip was rearranged by separating the DuPont wires and reconnecting on the terminal block side. This fast rearrangement due to the breadboard was a huge time saver.

Tangle of wires from controller

Stations were numbered from the bottom to the top so station one is at the bottom of the test base and station five is at the top. A large grounding wire (22AWG) was run to station three then branched out to each subsequent station. Each station was attached and appropriate wires were run to each terminal. Zip ties were used periodically to secure wires.

Each station

Test base with completed wiring

Files for Wind Generator Test Base:
The OpenSCAD file below is not necessary unless you want to change something
 To do:
  • Connect electrical to stations
  • Debug program
  • Go to next phase and test turbine designs

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-20 (W)

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

2015-05-19 (Tu) Wind Generator Test Base

Electrical wiring on the controller side was done. Controller-side wiring goes from the controller to a twelve position terminal strip. The controller, an Arduino Micro, was mounted on a breadboard and DuPont wires were run to the terminal strip. Color codes on the DuPont wires were ignored. Screw terminals were chosen for this project to use up cheap wire which solder wouldn't bond with.

Controller-side wiring

Wires to the test stations were salvaged from cheap ethernet wiring. Insulation from this cord was inferior since it would tear from any abrasion. Wires were not arranged in twisted pairs nor did they use a standard color code. Ethernet wire is typically 26AWG but this wire was so thin that the screw terminals had trouble binding the conductors. Two lengths were cut long enough to go from the test stations on the porch to a computer inside. Wires were terminated on the terminal strip for each half of the test base and ground wires were twisted together. Heavier grounding wires may be run in parallel to the Ethernet cord.

Station-side wiring

Files for Wind Generator Test Base:
The OpenSCAD file below is not necessary unless you want to change something
 To do:
  • Connect electrical to stations
  • Debug program
  • Go to next phase and test turbine designs

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-05-19 (Tu)