Sunday, January 31, 2016

2016-01-30 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

A new model replaced the first. It was virtually identical but 3mm shorter. Instead of using multiple recurrences of the simulated grommet it used cylinders to make grooves. The recurring grommet was causing problems when slicing the model to prepare it for printing. By making it from simple shapes the slicing routine didn't have any problems. It also made the code shorter. Before reduction the code for this spinner was 109 lines long and after it was 73 lines long. 1/3 of the code's bulk was gone.

Unwanted distortion in the print was reduced by adding support material. A picture was taken to illustrate the distortion in the old model, shown in the background, compared the to new model in the foreground. Some distortion was still present, mostly at the point where the two halves join, which will have to be sanded away before gluing halves together.

Picture showing the new model and old model

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-28 (Th)

Saturday, January 30, 2016

2016-01-29 (F) Weekly Summary

A slight detour was taken to make a pen holder which could be used as a straight-edge. This device was meant as a handy stand-in when a real straightedge wasn't immediately available. Basically an equilateral triangle was given a pen-shaped hole and the top was trimmed off to save plastic and to avoid making a pressurized chamber when a pen was inserted. It worked well but it was cumbersome to carry so it wound up on my desk at work. Coincidentally I also found out that Pigma Micron pens fit just as well as Sharpie pens. Printable files were on the blog post. This detour was a chance to teach myself about the polygon() and linear_extrude() commands in OpenSCAD.

 Spinning model of pen straight edge

Sharpie pen in holder
Pigma Micron pen in holder

Progress on the compass was in the form of another spinner design. This one would not rely on a keyed post or spinner, instead it would use a low-profile spinner with a protrusion on one side which would only collide with a protrusion from the case when it faced north. This isn't a new idea but before the protrusions had always been on the north side, this time they are located at the east or west positions to save space.

 New design sketch OUTSIDE view

To reduce abrasive collisions a rubber grommet would be installed into the spinner's shaft so it would gently bounce off the neoprene rubber rather than slam hard plastic into metal. In this way the only noticeable collisions should be between the spinner protrusion and the case protrusion.

New design sketch INSIDE view

While modeling the spinner and seeing the proportions it seemed more logical to go back to a cylindrical design. The design was only meant to wobble about the axis running through the north-to-south but there was no obvious reason to limit movement. The polygon() and linear_extrude() commands wouldn't be needed but I have already used the pen straight-edge a couple times so it wasn't wasted time or filament. With a cylindrical design it was possible to print ribs inside the cylinder which would allow a grommet to be repositioned until a good height was found.

 Spinner cutaway view with grommet positioning ribs

The model was intentionally produced in halves so that the grommet could be installed before it was assembled and effectively trap the grommet inside.

Different positions for internal grommet

A narrated video was taken explaining my observations of the spinner. The video was one minute long.

First spinner to use a grommet

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1
Completed projects from year 2


 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, January 29, 2016

2016-01-28 (Th) I dunno, some junk or jazz

It was a slow day. Most of the time was spent calibrating the 3D printer which was building shapes with many imperfections. The compass spinner halves printed earlier were not even flat on top so they fit together poorly. Another model should be printed in order to take a fair assessment and decide the next steps.

Calibrating printer screen

Parts were also gathered to start a Raspberry Pi Zero. Two ding/dent monitors were purchased in order to have inexpensive video for the computer and a spare monitor. The second may be used on a second Pi Zero if the first one proves useful as a kitchen computer. All of the parts, keyboard and video cables were already on hand.

 Pi Zero equipment

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-27 (W)

Thursday, January 28, 2016

2016-01-27 (W) ESPeri.Impass

Longer posts would likely be necessary soon so the hardware store was searched for almost an hour. Brass nails were the first thing to look for but most nails were only brass coated for decoration. Thick aluminum (aluminium) nails and short copper nails were found both both were unsuitable. While wandering aluminum rivets were found which were long and made without any iron. Pointed ends of the studs were sharpened by inserting the rivet into the chuck of a drill and spinning the point on a flat file. This method put a fine cone on the end of the privet.



The printed model was sized well and the grommet fit into all the desired locations. An animated picture was made with the grommet in three different positions. Unfortunately the plastic jumps around because it was jostled between pictures. Double-sided tape should have been put down before attempting this animation. This animation was meant to mimic yesterday's animation of virtual grommet positions.

Animation showing different grommet positions

A narrated video was taken showing the spinner with the grommet. Only one take was done so when the tape accidentally released in the middle of the recording I rolled with it. The video is one minute long.

Repositionable grommet spinner narrated video

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-26 (Tu)

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

2016-01-26 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

Model changes were made so instead of a single place for the grommet to rest there was a track which can fit the grommet in six different positions traveling down the shaft of the spinner. This adjustability should allow a balance to be found where the grommet can keep the spinner from swinging wildly (low) and a place where the neoprene can soften the impacts (high). Once a place is found where the grommet is most effective the  location can be coded into the model. For the second animation the six locations of the grommet are shown occupied by a virtual grommet but it should be noted that the actual neoprene object from the hardware store has a hole in the center.

Sketch of plan for repositioning the grommet

Spinning model

Six different grommet positions
To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-26 (Tu)

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

2016-01-25 (M) ESPeri.Impass

The spinner design mentioned yesterday was modeled. Some of the complex shapes in the original design were simplified. The area meant to hold the magnet was going to be an extruded rhombus but after seeing the model it seemed like it should be a cylinder. Making a rhombus is now possible with experience in relevant commands.

Instead of cutting and gluing neoprene washers a grommet was selected. Grommets available at a local hardware store provide a lip which can be locked into place although a high amount of tension isn’t necessary. The cylindrical hole through the grommet limits spinner movement and could even be squeezed so the deformation would guide the spinner.

Modeling the spinner was done as a whole but the spinner was cutaway so it could be printed in halves. Printing in halves ensures that a good finish will be made on the internal parts of the spinner and will allow a grommet to be installed. No parts were modeled to attach the halves so it would be glued.

Cutaway model of one half of spinner

A print was made but imperfections in the print lead to warping so the halves do not fit together correctly. Additionally the grommet doesn’t have enough clearance. There was no reason to make the grommet a tight fit so the next model may have a socket for the grommet which is intentionally oversized.

Print of two halves with grommet installed

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-25 (M)

Monday, January 25, 2016

2016-01-24 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

A new design was sketched. The largest problem with the old design was that there was no significant difference between a metal-plastic collision and a metal-metal collision. When the spinner would rattle around on the base there was no major difference if the brass post was tapping the nickel-plated magnets or the plastic spinner. On later models it wasn't possible to tell the difference between a metal-metal collision and the plastic spinner hitting the plastic sides of the shroud.

A much softer material will have to be used. Neoprene washers are easy to find and come in a variety of sizes. The new compass design will rely on many of the principles already learned on previous models. As this project progresses it is becoming more and more obvious that a single material will not be sufficient. Ideally a series of shapes could be printed and assembled with a pair of magnets but more steps will obviously be necessary. At least in order to get a model working.

The basic premise is that the magnets will not rest very close to the post and swing left to right instead of up and down. This should save space. Inside the post hole, which will be like a flattened cone, will be a layer of neoprene washers cut to fit inside the hole. There will also be a small washer, intact, installed right below the pivot point. All these points should keep the spinner from making any hard collisions no matter which direction the compass is facing. Off to one side will be a raised segment which will contact a bump on the case. Some of these features are common to the first models ever printed.

Sketch of inside of spinner

Sketch of outside of spinner and magnet

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-24 (Su)

Sunday, January 24, 2016

2016-01-23 (Sa) Miscellaneous 3D Printable Sharpie Pen Straight-Edge COMPLETED

Despite the fact that this looks like a total distraction from my compass project it is on track. Sort of. I've wanted to do this project for a bit, the idea has been in my head for a while now, but I never down and cranked out the code. Until today. This project was a change to use and really understand the linear_extrude() command in OpenSCAD. My next idea for the compass will require it and I've avoided unusual shapes, like equilateral triangles, because I was wary of the command.

Basically, I don't always have a straight edge when I'm drawing. I carry a lot of pens on a regular day but I don't usually have a ruler. A lot of my drawings would be neater if I did have a straight edge. This project is a sleeve for a Sharpie pen which will turn the Sharpie into a straightedge. Two would be printed and glued onto a couple pens. Two would be necessary in order to draw in both colors but if they can easily slide off I could just take it off when I need a straight edge.

Most likely it will be uncomfortable to write with and ultimately unusable but it's something worth trying with a 3D printer. I was going to make it a complete equilateral triangle but that brings up problems. For example, it might need a vent hole to allow the pen to be pushed into the very end. The biggest problem was that it would have to be printed vertically and the laminations of the printing would not leave a smooth edge. By printing it on its side the printer should lay down a nice neat line and give it a perfectly straight edge.

3D printable Sharpie pen sleeve

Printed model with a blue pen installed

Pigma pens also fit well



More posts like this one have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-23 (Sa)

Saturday, January 23, 2016

2016-01-22 (F) Weekly Summary

Changes were made to the key hole shape in the spinner. The picture below shows the old model on the far left and three new ones. The new ones have the same size round hole but the thickness of the slot changes. The diameter of the hole is equivalent to the distance around the nails in the base. The size of the slot needed to be close to the diameter of the nails so the spinner could wobble on the nails but only when facing north or south.

Changing holes in base

In order to accommodate the new spinners with the narrow slots a base was made where the nails were nearly touching. The gap was practically eliminated. In order to get the nails close enough the middle nail had the head cut away on two sides. It wound up being easier to simply crimp the nail head using large pliers.

Nails on top of nails

Fortunately the size of the compasses have been getting smaller and smaller. Many of the rough edges like using bolts to hold the top and bottom together will not be necessary but for now they are an easy way to hold things together.

Progress of compass size

A new path was tried. Rather than using a keyed post and a keyed spinner the keyed features were in the form of the shroud surrounding the base and the outside of the spinner. The principle was the same where the spinner was only allowed to wobble when facing the correct direction. Additionally, this was the first version which should wobble only when facing north. 

Keyed base

Keyed spinner

After spinning the previous version the keyed shroud had to be changed so the spinner could wobble freely but only when facing north. Previously the spinner would only tip up when facing north. By taking a section of the southern shroud it was possible to wobble up and down when facing north. Unfortunately this would allow the spinner to wobble up when facing south.

 Corrected keyed base

A problem with the spinner was the shape of the post hole. Where the post sat there only only a narrow cone which restricted the wobbling to an unusable level. The shape was revised to a cone which was drastically narrowed on the sides.

Comparison of post holes

A narrow cone worked well for increasing movement but the magnets couldn't contact the post so a hybrid shape was modeled which was a large cone on top of a cube. A haptic compass still hasn't been made.

Hybrid post hole shape

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1
Completed projects from year 2


 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, January 22, 2016

2016-01-21 (Th) ESPeri.Impass

Shape of the post hole had to be revised again. While the spinner sat on the post it could not reach the magnet due to where the magnets sat which was protected by the post hole. Instead of a cone shape the post hole was modeled to look like a cone on top of a cuboid. This shape is a mix of the first shape which used a small cone on top of large cuboid and yesterday’s shape which was only a large cone.

New post hole shape

Spinner model

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-20 (W)

Thursday, January 21, 2016

2016-01-20 (W) ESPeri.Impass

The base was remodeled to include a second gap. Yesterday’s base only had one gap to allow the front of the magnet to wobble but the back end could still hit the wall. By removing another segment the spinner can freely move up and down when facing north.

Keyed base with two gaps

Another problem with yesterday’s model was the spinner. A very narrow hole was provided for the post to rest in. This narrow hole limited the amount the spinner could move up and down. Instead of a wide open space with a narrow post hole a wide slope was used. Changes to the spinner should allow the magnets to strike the metal post.

Comparison of old and new post slots

Spinner model

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-19 (Tu)

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

2016-01-19 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

A new spinner and base were made. Instead of a keyed post and keyed spinner the outside of the spinner and the shroud of the base act as the keyed components. The slot in the bottom of the spinner should only allow the spinner to rock in one direction but not wobble to the sides. The raised shroud should keep the rocking limited to when the compass is pointed north. This design is the first one meant to differentiate between north and south.

Spinner model

Base and lid models


To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-18 (M)

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

2016-01-18 (M) ESPeri.Impass

The base designed for yesterday's spinner needed the nails to be much closer together. In fact, they wound up touching each other they were so close. Printing produced a single hole with a shape roughly resembling three holes close to one another.

The shape of the hole can be seem if viewed in high resolution

A small drill bit was used to open the holes to the correct size. The central nail, which the spinner rested on, had to have the sides trimmed then compressed in order to fit all three nails in place. Flush cutting pliers were used to trim the sides and ordinary pliers were used to flatten/crimp the sides.

Spinner with three nails installed

Superglue was used to hold all three nails in place. Tension had been enough in previous models but this version lost much of the supporting plastic when installing the nails so close to one another. The compass performed well. The spinner would spin freely and wobble the most at north or south.

Nails glued in place         

Video demonstration of spinner and base

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-17 (Su)

Monday, January 18, 2016

2016-01-17 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

Three new spinners were printed. Slots around the central pivot point were significantly narrower to reduce the angle where the magnets can strike the post. This was a problem since the spinner could strike the post, which is supposed to mean the user is pointed north or south, in a wide degree of motion. In other words there was not enough precision in the old model. A comparison picture was taken to illustrate the differences between the old model, left, and the three new prints.

Old model, far left, next to three new models

A new base was printed. The shortened nails to the sides of the central post were modeled closer to the center and the middle post was sleeved with metal tubes to make it wider in the middle. This shape was meant to be closer to the old model which was more precise.

Base constructed with sleeves over central pin

Size of the compasses have been decreasing, which is good for the development of the compass. The last three working models were arranged on a desktop in order to take a picture comparing their sizes and differences. The largest one, on the left, used a bulky sphere with large magnets close to the center and wasted space at the perimeter. The middle print could tap on the prominent brass screw poking out the top but the magnets were positioned very high which lead to wasted space below the magnets and a top-heavy spinner which was unstable. Finally, the current model, on the right, uses a cylindrical spinner meant to tap on the internal metal post and had much less wasted space. All spinners were mounted between two printed layers for the base and lid and spaced with brass bolts.

Size comparison of last three revisions


To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-15 (F)

Sunday, January 17, 2016

2016-01-16 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

A new model was printed which had the screws closer together. The base appears thick but is actually bottom-side-up so that cylinders could be printed which kept the side nails from going as deep as the central nail. This distance should have been much greater because the side nails only needed to be a couple millimeters taller than the base so they were cut off instead.

Base with trimmed nails

A fine degree of control was possible with the side nails so the spinner was revised to have a narrower slot. The spinner print on the left shows a pretty wide slot and not much difference between the round segment and the square segment. The updated spinner on the right shows a clear difference between the circular hole and the straight sides.

Updated spinner and new base

Height on the spinner was reduced so a single pin from the base would be long enough to reach the spinner. It worked well.

Spinner spinning

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-01-14 (Th)