Thursday, March 31, 2016

2016-03-30 (W) Charged: DesertIrish

Dawson started with his tantrum about Jason trading away The Flying Machine. Dawson went for a run and slowed to have a meditation session of sorts. The way he got to the bottom of the problem was to pose questions then answer them. Most of the questions revolved around him being jealous of Numbers. This came around to show that he had no reason to be jealous and every reason to be grateful. Back from his jog he began reading Jason’s explanation which appeared to be written like part of a larger story.

During the story Dawson paraphrases what he read in Jason’s story rather than include the whole story.

The story is about Jason’s experiences after he left the dock with The Flying Machine. He went to Europe and visited tourist areas in a highly illogical manner but it didn’t matter since he was able to travel so quickly. This part was not given much focus since it didn’t relate to the part about The Flying Machine but was able to remind the reader that Jason can speak different languages and sense bodies in all directions.

Dawson picks up when Jason travels to Tibet while tracking another artifact, which Jason already admitted he gained for The Flying Machine. In Tibet Jason travels up a mountain looking for clues but doesn’t find anything until he uses the tracking feature unlocked by Head. After that he finds two monks identified by The Flying Machine and comes back to talk to them.

The monks put him to work doing chores suited to a tall person and in the evening they take him on a walk in the mountains.

Charged

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple.
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power."
  • Create a cheat sheet for the characters and their abilities.
  • Describe a reality TV show which demonstrates the powers of contestants.
  • Describe a trial where a Charged person sues for the right to have a second identity but the case turns against him into a vilification of vigilanteism.
Total word count: 20 424 + 60 228 + 83 897 = 164 549 words

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-03-21 (M)

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

2016-03-29 (Tu) Drip Coffee Maker COMPLETED

When the polyurethane was dry the flat surfaces were sanded smooth with 600grit abrasive paper. The decoratively routed edges were not sanded because they became hazy when sanded after the first coat.

The top platform had the 1/4-20 rods inserted into the sockets already embedded in the wood. Corresponding brass nuts were added to the rod and tightened against the socket. These nuts would not be very visible but brass was still used because they would be seen if someone inspected it closely. Brass tubes were put over the threaded rod.

Threaded rods, brass nuts and brass tubes

On top of the brass tube finishing washers were placed so the tube captured the depression in the middle of the washer. These were tightened in place with more brass nuts. These nuts were tightened hard enough to hold everything securely but not enough to deform the washers. Since the brass rods were all the same length the bottom platform rested levelly when placed on the exposed stubs of the threaded rods.

Bottom platform with finishing washers and brass nuts

On the bottom of the platform brass washers were put against the wood and more nuts were added to hold everything solid. Thick rubber feet were also purchased so the whole device would not scratch any surface where it was placed. Their flexibility also allowed minor differences in the brass rod to go unnoticed or it might not sit level. Using three rods would have eliminated this concern.

Rubber feet on underside of bottom platform

The finishing touch was four brass corner protectors. These flashy components were the reason the bottom platform was not routed. Each of them required a square corner so there were no gaps. They attach with three included screws each. Pilot holes were drilled for each screw using a hand screwdriver.

Brass corners attached to the bottom platform

With all the components attached the project was completed and the mirror was placed on the center before the Chemex coffee maker was placed on that. A photo burst was taken to give a 3D sense of the project.

Completed coffee maker

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.
First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-03-02 (W)

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

2016-03-28 (M) Drip Coffee Maker

Polyurethane layer number one was rough, which was to be expected. The surface was slightly rough to the touch which was logical since this was satin finish polyurethane. Two coats were planned and the second coat was meant to further smooth surface texture missed while sanding.

 Dried layer of polyurethane

High grit abrasive paper was used on the first layer of polyurethane which had been drying for more than 24 hours. All the drying was done in a well-ventilated room but air flow was not high so the polyurethane dried slower than desired. Sanding was attempted after 16 hours but the surface was “gummy.”

 Abrasive paper after sanding

A second layer of polyurethane was applied with a sponge brush. The first layer was applied with a bristled chip brush and left numerous bubbles on the surface. A sponge brush eliminated this problem almost entirely. Another chip brush was purchased just in case but was not used. Both brushes were discarded after they had been allowed to dry.

 Second coat

The surface of this layer was noticeably smoother than the first which suggests the second coat was important and more of the surface fluctuations were filled in. Using a sponge brush may also have impacted the finish.

 Fresh layer of polyurethane

While the polyurethane dried a hobby store was visited to find a mirror which would rest below the coffee maker. The mirror was intended to make the middle of the project look interesting while there was no coffee maker in place, add some easy flair and protect the wood from the coffee maker. There were two beveled mirrors that were appealing. The first was a hexagonal mirror and the second was a round mirror. The hexagon mirror was more unique but the circular mirror resembled the coffee maker and the cutout in the top platform it will rest beneath.

Mirror choices

To do:
  • Buy bristle brush and foam brush
  • Apply second coat of polyurethane
  • Buy hexagon mirror
  • Assemble

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-29 (M)

Monday, March 28, 2016

2016-03-27 (Su) Drip Coffee Maker

1/4-20 bolts were inserted in the top platform so it would be elevated after applying the polycarbonate. Since there were no bolt sockets in the bottom platform small cones were made from some PSA (Pressure Sensitive Adhesive) labels. These cones were meant to take the place of painter's triangles which are commonly used to elevate items after they are painted so the paint can dry on both sides at once.

Elevation methods for each platform

A thick layer of polyurethane was applied to each board while wearing gloves. Since this item will be used with food the goal was to apply two coats of protective polyurethane. Even though the wooden parts will not make contact with food it seemed like a good choice. The thick layers should also ensure a good looking finish for a long time.

Single layer of polyurethane

A bristle brush was used to apply the polyurethane. In fact, a chip brush which are used as disposable brushes. The coarse bristles left small bubbles and an uneven finish. A sponge brush would probably be a better choice. Yesterday a foam brush was used to apply stain and a bristle brush may have been a better choice, today the opposite is true. Perhaps higher quality brushes are the answer. In any case, the polyurethane will be allowed to dry before it is sanded and a second layer is applied. A foam brush and a bristle brush will both be available for the next layer.



To do:
  • Buy bristle brush and foam brush
  • Apply second coat of polyurethane
  • Buy hexagon mirror
  • Assemble
  • Gift wrap

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-28 (Su)

Sunday, March 27, 2016

2016-03-26 (Sa) Drip Coffee Maker

Minx Dark Walnut stain was purchased. This stain did not have polyurethane mixed in because two coats of clear polyurethane were desired. Using stain last time lead to very messy hands so gloves were also purchased. This is highly recommended.

Glove, stain and wood 

Stain was applied according to directions with a sponge applicator. Next time a brush with bristles will be used since the sponge left bubbles which had to be smoothed out. Stain was applied over the metal 1/4-20 sockets since they shouldn't be visible.

Freshly stained wood platforms

To do:
  • Buy hexagon mirror
  • Measure height of coffee maker and reservoir nozzle
  • Apply polyurethane coats
  • Assemble
  • Gift wrap

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-23 (Tu)

Saturday, March 26, 2016

2016-03-25 (F) Weekly Summary

Last week started with a move. I left my lonely two bedroom apartment to mix kitchen appliances with my girlfriend in the top floor of a two-bedroom duplex. Before I lived in a suburb that was uneventful and nothing was really in walking distance. It was so boring. My girlfriend knows the cities and found us a lively area which is close to an adorable corner-store attached to a little hardware store. It has a small town feel except that it is not isolated. I probably sound like I’m writing for a realtor right now but let’s just say that I am excited to live here.

Most of the STUFF moved into the new place

Months and months ago, last year actually, I started a drip coffee machine. I thought drip coffee would be a neat experiment since I had had good luck with cold-press coffee. Coming up with a concrete design was not easy and that was the reason I didn’t start publishing it months ago. But, it picked up so I’m publishing blogs about it since I’ve finally nailed down a design I’m excited about. In the beginning I wanted it to look Victorian and I think I managed to keep that aesthetic a little. It’s not overwrought and I didn’t just glue some gears to it. Most of my work is utilitarian but this was meant to look nice. I didn’t want visible hardware like nuts and bolts and I wanted a dark stain for the wood. The project started with a glass container, a rose bowl, which is meant to be a water reservoir to slowly drip water onto coffee grounds. A brass valve and rubber stopper were added to the top of the container to hold the water inside when it is filed and flipped over.

Brass valve through rubber stopper added to glass jar

Since the needle valve used at the bottom only allows a tiny amount of fluid to pass it won’t allow water to drip out so a breather tube was added. This tube, made of brass like the valve, simply allows air to flow to the top of the container while it’s draining. So long as the water level isn’t covering the breather tube no water should escape that way.


Breather tube installed in water reservoir

The water reservoir wasn’t difficult, despite being more complex, the difficulty was finding a something to hold the coffee grounds while water dripped onto them. Different considerations needed to be taken for a coffee holder, like a filter. It needs to be easy to remove the used grounds and filters must be replaceable. These factors lead to a lot of wandering in hardware stores looking for something suitable. A copper pipe coupler, some O-rings and a PVC adapter were my desperate attempt. Do not buy these materials, they didn’t work for me and only threw a wrench (spanner) in the works and halted this project for months.

First attempt at a coffee grounds holder

After months of secret hiatus I had a new idea for the coffee maker. I set to work after buying a nice looking consumer-grade coffee pour-over coffee maker. Instead of trying to copy a design I had seen before which looked like pretty lab equipment I finally shook off the preconceptions and designed from scratch. Sometimes climbing out of the box is harder than the actual work; it was this time. I was able to maintain the look I wanted but the design and building changed dramatically. The water reservoir was also kept but the coffee holder was scrapped.

Upper platform to hold water reservoir

A conceptual drawing was sketched on graph paper and can be seen next to the wood cut for the two platforms. Instead of looking like lab equipment where each part of the maker was held on a stem this will use two platforms to hold a pour-over below the water reservoir. The platforms were cut from stocked 2x12 lumber. The drawing has a hexagon which was supposed to be a mirror.

 Platforms and conceptual drawing

Separating the platforms would normally be an easy task but with aesthetics being so important the obvious choices were too unsightly. This lead to another bout of wandering around a hardware store and touching everything. Finally a solution presented itself with the available parts. To keep the bolts out of sight the top platform would use bolt sockets which could be installed from one side. Normally bolts go all the way through an item and fasten on the far side.

Bolt sockets installed in upper platform

Supports for the upper platform were going to be 1/4-20 bolts but they were covered in brass tubes since the hardware store stocked those parts. Originally I had wanted to use copper pipe, which would have been much larger and less expensive, but the pipe had printing on the side so brass was used. Pipes and threaded rod were cut to precise lengths to make the supports going between the platforms.

Tubes and bolts cut to length

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1
Completed projects from year 2


 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by  Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, March 25, 2016

2016-03-24 (Th) Drip Coffee Maker

Four brass tubes were cut to 12" (30cm) long. This was done by simply lining up the brass rod with a ruler and keeping one end flush and moving the two together until they bumped into the wheel on the pipe cutter. Uniformity turned out very well.

Ruler used as the standard for tube length

Pilot holes were drilled in the bottom platform. These pilot holes served two purposes. The first reason was that the top and bottom platform could be sandwiched together and the hole position could be translated to the top piece accurately. The second reason, and most important, was to drill the hole from the top and bottom instead of drilling straight through. By drilling each hole from both sides there was no damaging hole blowout.

 Half drilled at 1/4" (6mm) before drilling from the other side

Holes in the top half were drilled to 3/8" (9.5mm) so the steel inserts could be screwed into place. These sockets had 1/4-20 threads which would receive a 1/4-20 bolt but they would not go all the way through wood which would have added an unsightly nut to the other side. This particular socket was driven into the wood with a 10mm hex key. Some use a flathead screwdriver.

Partially drilled hole to receive a 1/4-20 socket

All four sockets were installed into the top platform. Care was taken to not over-tighten them because that could damage the surrounding wood. No more drilling should be necessary.

1/4-20 sockets installed in underside of top platform

After the drilling was complete it was possible to size the threaded rods which were longer than a standard bolt size. Brass tubes and two brass nuts were put on the threaded rod to get an estimate on the length needed. Several washers will also be used but their height is not as important so the rods would be sized generously.

Estimating the length for threaded rods

Four threaded rods were cut to length with a band saw. Each end was ground smooth on a grinder. Recently the hack space acquired a mitering cut-off saw which might have eliminated the need for some of the grinding. It will probably be used in the future.

Brass tubes and threaded rods laid out

To do:
  • Buy hexagon mirror
  • Measure height of coffee maker and reservoir nozzle
  • Apply walnut stain
  • Apply polyurethane coats
  • Assemble
  • Gift wrap

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-26 (F)

Thursday, March 24, 2016

2016-03-23 (W) Drip Coffee Maker

This project was secretly on hiatus for six months. All the work done for the coffee and filter holder has been abandoned. It was too much trouble and way more complicated than it should have been. Interest was renewed when I saw a commercial drip coffee maker I liked and matched the look of this project. The Chemex coffee maker isn’t a cheap coffee maker but it looks nice and supposedly makes wonderful coffee.

If that wasn’t enough to tip the scales my girlfriend said it was a nice looking maker so I decided to make this for her and gift it to her as a birthday present.

With renewed interest and time distance I was able to approach the stand in a whole new way. Instead of the convoluted methods I was thinking of before I decided on a simple platform that the reservoir would slide into. That would be held over the coffee maker by some 1/4-20 bolts with brass tubes over them.

Enough background
----------

Stocked 1x12 lumber from a previous project was cut into two identical lengths, one for the top platform and one for the bottom platform. The top platform was given a keyhole-shaped hole where the reservoir can slide in from the side.

1x12 cut to length and given a cutout for the reservoir

The hole in the top platform was routed with a round-over bit so it would lock into the reservoir groove. The first round-over bit was too shallow and didn’t cut off enough wood. A deeper bit was substituted and was actually so deep it cut away more than half the depth of the wood and would gradually expand the hole if the sides were routed one after another. One pass on each side was enough to make a groove that would lock the reservoir in place.

Routed on both sides for a round edge

A deep router bit lead to a pointed edge on the inside so it was smoothed with an oscillating spindle sander. This could have been done by hand with ordinary sandpaper and wouldn’t have taken long but this was a new tool at the hack space so it was used instead.

Inside edges smoothed with an oscillating spindle sander

Once inserted the glass reservoir held firmly in place and the platform could be held at almost any angle with minimal wobbling. The largest criteria for this fit was cutting the initial keyhole-shaped hole to the size of the reservoir’s groove, not the size of the lip.

 Water reservoir held by wood

Carpentry on the top was finished by routing the edges with a decorative routing bit. No routing was meant to be done on the bottom which had brass corner protectors purchased for its decoration. These corner protectors were also used on the Desktop Chording Keyboard.

Router used for a decorative edge

A picture was taken of the platforms next to a drawing of the proposed design. So far the design is on track. A hexagon mirror still needs to be purchased which will go under the coffee maker.

Top and bottom piece next to design sketch

To do:
  • Buy hexagon mirror
  • Measure height of coffee maker and reservoir nozzle
  • Cut four brass tube lengths
  • Drill 1/4” holes in bottom platform
  • Translate hole positions to top platform underside
  • Blind drill holes into top platform
  • Insert 1/4-20 sockets with hex wrench
  • Cut threaded rod to length
  • Assemble and test for fit
  • Disassemble
  • Apply walnut stain
  • Apply polyurethane coats
  • Assemble
  • Gift wrap

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-23 (Tu)

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

2016-03-22 (Tu) Drip Coffee Maker

After making a hole with a brass tube in the neoprene stopper it was necessary to shorten the tube so it would not interfere with the rest of the coffee maker parts, particularly those below the water bulb (vase). The stopper was placed in the bulb securely and the tube was pushed down so it was held a few millimeters from the far end of the bulb. When the bulb is placed in the coffee maker, with the opening down, this will maintain a small gap.

Breather tube before trimming

Breather tube at bottom of bowl

With the gap established a line was drawn on the brass tube to designate where it would be cut. This line could have been drawn flush with the stopper but it was decided to have it extend as far as the valve for purely aesthetic reasons. A small pipe cutter was used to cut the tube to the desired length which produced a nice end. The cut end was situated inside the bulb so any sharp edges from the cut would not be accessible.

Marking a spot level with the valve

Cut tube end

Tube installed with bulb

Below the water bulb will be a cylinder to hold and filter coffee grounds. Most drip coffee makers have a wide basin for catching the dripping water. It was hypothesized that having a tall slender receptacle for the coffee would keep water in contact with coffee grounds for longer and therefore make stronger coffee. A coffee holder was constructed with a 2" brass coupler, four #99 O-rings, a black 1 1/2" smooth to threaded adapter and a threaded cap.

#99 O-rings. Four of them

Brass coupler, O-rings, and PVC parts

O-rings. Four of them

O-rings were put over the smooth end of the PVC adapter to make a seal between the copper and the plastic part. Four were used to make a strong seal and build up the seals from the middle of the adapter. Each O-ring required some effort to place it on the PVC adapter. When tested with the copper coupler they fit securely. The O-rings may slide off the PVC adapter when removed from the brass coupler but can be replaced the same way they were installed.

O-rings placed on PVC adapter

Coupler resting at and angle on the PVC adapter and O-rings

To do:
  • Build stand
  • Build cylindrical coffee holder
  • Mount coffee holder
  • Add filter
  • Build base
  • Design and build water jar holder
  • Add tube for water jar to prevent vacuum

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-08-03 (M)

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

2016-03-21 (M) Drip Coffee Maker

To prevent a vacuum from keeping water in the upper bulb a way of letting air into the bulb was necessary. Simply adding a hole at the bottom would allow water to rush out uncontrollably so a "snorkel" needed to be added which would put an air tube at the top of the bulb while it was installed in the coffee maker. A 6mm (1/4") brass tube (hollow rod or pipe) was purchased from a hobby store but a smaller size would have worked equally well. 6mm happened to be the least expensive brass tube because smaller diameters were only available in multiple packs.

Ideas for making a hole ranged from using a standard drill bit to a leather punch. Ultimately, the stopper was made of soft neoprene so it was simple enough to push and twist the brass tube through the stopper. Pushing took several minutes and running water over the tube helped to lubricate it while pushing. 12mm (1/2") was left between the back of the valve and the tube to ensure clearance.

Brass tube pushed through a neoprene stopper

After pushing the brass tube through the neoprene stopper it was important to remove the cut neoprene from the tube. Chopsticks were put into the brass tube to extract the cut neoprene. If a smaller tube were to be used a smaller diameter pusher would be necessary such as a wooden dowel.

Chopsticks next to tube

Partially extracted neoprene cutaway

Neoprene cutaway


To do:

  • Build stand
  • Build cylindrical coffee holder
  • Add filter
  • Build base
  • Design and build water jar holder
  • Add tube for water jar to prevent vacuum


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-08-02 (Su)

Monday, March 21, 2016

2016-03-20 (Su) Drip Coffee Maker

I was not a big coffee fan until I started making cold brew coffee in a French press. I even went as far as to freeze that coffee and make a 2-ingredient iced coffee drink. I was not disappointed and I am even sipping on some as I write this.

Drip coffee makers look cool. They function well and don't have any parts more complex than a valve. I'll even tell you how to build one without even using a valve! They are the next level but expensive. Then I saw a neat Instructable about how to make one and I decided it was within my reach. Naturally I am going to add my own twist and, in a rare turn of events, I am going to put effort into making this project look nice. In fact, I am going for a steampunk look.


Enough background.
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A vase was purchased from a thrift store. Shape was important, the opening had to be large enough to accept regular size ice cubes and there also had to be a flare at the top and bottom. The flare was to allow the vase to be suspended upside-down. A rubber (neoprene) stopper was purchased from a lab supply store, #13 in this case. Cork would have worked as well. Plumbing hardware was purchased to attach a needle valve to a barb connector. In this case a barb connector, bushing, and a needle valve. It may be possible to use different plumbing parts which would cost less and if that's possible I recommend it since these cost over $10 USD. It is possible to completely ignore the plumbing parts and instead fill the vase with ice cubes which will regulate their own flow by melting slowly and water will only drip as fast as the ice melts. You may want to try that method first before spending money on the brass fixtures.

Vase from above

Side view of vase to show shape

Large stopper

Hardware for attaching a needle valve

Teflon tape (PTFE tape) was used on the threads of the brass fittings. Teflon tape should always be wrapped around the threads so that it tightens as the fittings are wrench tightened. Here's a quick video, skip to 1:54 to jump right into the technique. The brass fittings should allow the barbed end to hold in the rubber stopper. The rubber stopper I purchased had approximately a 1/4" (6mm) hole so a 1/4 in ID (8mm) barb worked well. Once all the brass pieces were assembled they were pushed into the stopper.

Assembled plumbing pieces

Water jar assembled

To do:

  • Build stand
  • Build cylindrical coffee holder
  • Add filter
  • Build base
  • Design and build water jar holder
  • Add tube for water jar to prevent vacuum

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



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2015-07-30 (Th)