Monday, October 31, 2016

2016-10-30 (Su) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone BONUS CONTENT


BONUS HALLOWEEN CONTENT

Editing was a special trick this time. Three different sessions were recorded and two of them were scripted. Tim and I don't like to read from scripts. Our intro and outro have been scripted but it's all right if they sound a little wooden.

Today was an exception because we went for fiction. You'll see what I mean. We did a mock interview with an unusual guest. Tim used a voice modulator to portray the visitor. He and I had been talking about this interview for a long time and Halloween, a day for costumes, seemed like a good time to include this.

We each wrote a script. I wrote mine first but it wasn't quite what Tim had in mind so he wrote his own version. We put Tim's in the show but they were both fun so we put mine at the end of the regular show.

Check it out on the Show page!

I'm a cyborg 364 days a year. Not Halloween though, then I'm a sexy nurse


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-10-18 (Tu)

Sunday, October 30, 2016

2016-10-29 (Sa) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


BONUS HALLOWEEN CONTENT

Instead of a regular show we recorded a special episode that was outside of our usual topic but still kind of relate to biohacking. Cosmetic enhancements. These were everything from breast enhancements to steel spikes mounted on a person's skull. I couldn't believe that was a thing.

Since Tim and I decided this was a bonus material it doesn't follow the usual release dates and it's going to be released on Halloween. And on top of that, we removed a bit of professionalism and decided to try cracking wise and maybe there's some profanity too. There were definitely dick jokes, I remember that for certain.

Check it out on Halloween day!

I'm a cyborg 364 days a year. Not Halloween though, then I'm a sexy nurse


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-10-06 (Th)

Friday, October 28, 2016

2016-10-28 (Th) Clockwork Theremin

The two largest gears of this project will be responsible for turning the small potentiometers which control the sine wave generator. This amount of torque is overkill. The rod supporting the largest gear, and all the gears, is 5/16” (8mm). Coupling this rod to a potentiometer knob is not commonly done so an adapter will be made. The shaft coupling will simply be a small length of stiff hose. This hose should slip over the two shafts to couple them and still allow for some leniency with regards to alignment and distance.

It will be necessary to keep the shafts aligned as well as possible while keeping the potentiometer base from rotating. A model was made in two parts. The first part was meant to clamp around the bearing holder and the second part was meant to be suspended below it and keep the potentiometer steady. The part meant to clamp to the bearing holder has a hole in the side for a set screw.

Rotating view of model

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


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This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-26 (W)

Thursday, October 27, 2016

2016-10-27 (W) Clockwork Theremin

After all yesterday’s problems, it seems fitting to share the solutions.

The spool from the printer cartridge was removed. All the loose tangled filament was a mess. Since a spool holder never had to be used before one had to be improvised. Designs for a PVC pipe model started to materialize. Instead of taking the time to construct something new an ordinary sitting stool was laid on its side on top of the printer. This provided a horizontal bar where the spool could sit and unravel. You know what they say, "If it looks stupid but it works, then it's not stupid."

Improvised filament spool holder

The spool had to be minded carefully since the loose filament wanted to unwind and tangle around the stool leg. Fortunately, this was the first time one of these commercial cartridges had problems like this.

Filament tangling around leg

A hole saw bit was selected which was close to the diameter of the bearing holder. They were such a close match that it is unlikely there will be a need to change the model. Minor sanding could be necessary.

Comparison of hole saw and bearing holder

Measurements were taken to align the largest gear on the backing board. The hole saw was used to cut a hole. The hole was not exactly centered on the board. Instead, it was higher so the gear would not extend below the bottom which could create problems when operating or transporting.

Offset hole cut with hole saw

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-25 (Tu)

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

2016-10-25 (Tu) Clockwork Theremin

I don’t like screwing up. For one, it slows the process of a project. Secondly, messing up doesn't make a fun blog post. But today, nothing went right for the Clockwork Theremin except for one thing. Fortunately, that one thing, inspiration, was probably enough to carry the whole day.

Enough background.
----------

Plans for a low-profile gear hub had been developing for days. It was becoming increasingly important to decide on a design which would not be so bulky that the gears would be forced to different planes. Making the gears lie on the same plane is vital for them to function and small deviations could cause the system to fail. Creating the spoked hub was one method for helping the gears mesh neatly.

While writing yesterday’s post it occurred to me that the gear doesn’t need to spin on the shaft, it would work equally well if the shaft could spin. In skate parts, like longboards and inline skates, the axle is stationary and the wheels spin on it.

The program for the spoked hub was used and a model was created without spokes which would mount to the backboard. A spoked hub could have been used but it seemed like a waste of plastic.

After the IoTHackDay all the printer filament was used up. Three more cartridges were still in stock. Here is where the problems started. Two of the three cartridges were PLA, which hasn’t been used in the printer before. It was a branded cartridge meant for the printer. As soon as it was loaded the printer warned that it could not be used until the nozzle was upgraded. In other words, the manufacturer failed to advertise that the cartridge would only work with the purchase of additional hardware.

One cartridge of ABS was handy so it was unwrapped and installed into the printer. This print started nicely but after running for an hour the printer emitted awful sounds which meant the stepper motors were skipping. This can be caused by a jam in the machine or when the print head is wrapped in the electrical wires. After investigating, the culprit was the printer cartridge. The coiled filament was tangled in itself and wouldn’t allow any more to be drawn out. As the tension increased the printer became confused about where the plastic was supposed to be and the print was finally canceled.

It was a bad day for projecting and the ugly tangle of printer filament will have to be put on an external spool, like that used on many other printers, until enough filament is gone to fit inside the cartridge.


Ugly mess of a filament spool

Ruined prints. Notice how the rings keep getting farther from center

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

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Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-24 (M)

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

2016-10-24 (M) Clockwork Theremin

Another spoked hub was printed to match another gear. This hub was installed the same as yesterday with short 1/4" (6mm) long screws.

A 4' x 8' (1.2m x 2.4m) piece of hardboard was purchased to be the mounting board for all the gears. Laying the gears out in the actual position they were going to be mounted was hugely beneficial to deciding the next step. Mounting them to rotate and interlock will be a challenge. For days, a suitable design has been bouncing around in my head, but while writing this sentence it occured to me, finally, that creating a low profile hub with bearings was silly, the bearings should be conected to the board so only an axle coming out is necessary. This way the gears won't need any special mouting techniques and the bearings can be kept out of sight.

Gears in their proposed positions

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


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Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-23 (Su)

Monday, October 24, 2016

2016-10-23 (Su) Clockwork Theremin

A custom spoked hub was printed to match the gear. Since the size of the hole saw couldn't be changed, it was necessary to change the size of the part. This was the opposite of conventional design where the cut would be made differently to accommodate the part. In a way, 3D printing has kind of turned that aspect of design on its head.

Spoked hub with no wiggle room

Very short screws were purchased from a local hardware store. The screws were #2 (1.5mm) and 1/4" (6mm) long. Twelve screws were purchased since two hubs would be installed and each hub used six screws. The number of screw holes was programmed to match the number of spokes. If desired, the hubs could have been printed with any number of screws or spokes but six seemed reasonable at the time. Matching the number of spokes to the number of screw holes also had the benefit of attaching a screw at the termination point of a spoke for maximized stability.

Underside of installed hub

Working with the miniature screws was difficult. They were prone to slipping and bouncing into unwelcome places. The ring finger magnet was a huge convenience when picking up and handling the screws.

Utility finger magnet

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-21 (F)

Sunday, October 23, 2016

2015-10-22 (Sa) Third Annual IoTHackDay EMG Musical Instrument Controller

For three years running, I've participated in the IoTHackDay held in Minneapolis. This year, I had more fun than ever. The team was all people I knew, including the organizer and captain, Doug. For all three years he has been the inspiration behind the projects we've tackled.
Year one, two years ago.
Year two, one year ago.

I gave the final presentation for our group and I got to talk about how the day went for us.

Me, giving the final presentation for our group

The hackers in full swing

 We started the day with the intention of reading a muscle's activity through electromyoencepholagraphy (EMG) and using that signal to change the slider position on a slide whistle. A pretty simple premise and not actually IoT related. We hit every bump in the road while having a fun time. In the morning we discovered we didn't have all the parts we would need so I went to a nearby surplus story to pick up scraps. Three of our teammates brought parts and we still didn't have everything we needed.

This is how much stuff I brought


Our whistle was selected and 3D printed on the day of the project. We thought the use of 3D printing would make our project more appealing. Unfortunately whistles are more complex than I was lead to believe. A slide whistle is a surprisingly finicky instrument. My task for the day was getting the whistle functioning. I started by buying a cooling fan from the surplus store, taking measurements and creating a model in OpenSCAD which would allow the whistle to receive air from the fan. Two things went wrong with this endeavor. The whistle wouldn't make sound with the included plunger and the fan did not push enough air anyway. Despite the failure, it was an excellent lesson in guerilla modeling.


Rotating model of fan to whistle adapter. It looked like a traffic cone with a USB port on top

Printed version of the model with the whistle inserted

While the model connected properly, it didn't create sound so it was ultimately useless for the hack day. Nonetheless, I'm proud of the model and perhaps I'll try a larger fan with a commercially available slide whistle. Now that I know in ins and outs of a slide whistle perhaps I'll automate one.

The team members working on the EMG portion of the project didn't have much luck either. There were issues with the sensors and getting reliable data. At one point, Doug had duct taped the sensor to his forearm with the hope of getting good readings but he mostly managed to tear out hair from his arm.

The rest of the team at work

Fortunately, our teammate Angeliki, had experience with electroencephalography (EEG) and was able to cobble together a hacked MindFlex toy headset and some servos which struck a toy glockenspiel. In other words, she completed last years project by herself, with only half of the day to work.

My mind is already buzzing with ideas for next year's project.

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-23 (Sa)

Saturday, October 22, 2016

2016-10-21 (F) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone EPISODE 11


Episode eleven was edited. Behind the scenes, this took longer than it should have but releasing episodes on schedule has been important.

During the last episode, Tim and I discussed the idea of changing the music at the intro and outro but we decided to keep it the way it was. For editing, this song was completely removed so it had to be added in all over. This was time-consuming and actually happened to this episode and the last episode at the same time.

Tim and I are becoming more fluent while recording and we hope this makes for a more enjoyable show. All our episodes, even the starchy sounding first episodes, can be found on the SHOW PAGE or any of the links at the top and bottom of this post.

Tim has his teeth parted


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-09-22 (W)

Friday, October 21, 2016

2016-10-20 (Th) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


Episode eleven was the second part of the two-part series on interfaces. Last time the subject was inputs and this time, the subject was outputs. Originally this was going to be a single show but there was enough information to cover in two shows. There was easily enough information during the inputs recording to cover two shows.

We designated outputs as ones which alert the human body to data. This could be as simple as the vibrator on your phone to notify you of a text message or the chime on your computer to tell you there is an email waiting to be read.

Off the air, we decided "inputs" and "outputs" were a poor choice of words because they don't draw a clean line between the two. In fact, some transducers can emit and detect at the same time. An LED can act as a light sensor, a piezo element can act as a speaker or a microphone.

I'm the one with clenched teeth


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
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Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-08-25 (Th)

Thursday, October 20, 2016

2016-10-19 (W) Clockwork Theremin

Cutting the core out of a gear was nerve-wracking. A lot of time went into shaping the gears, especially the large ones so taking a large chuck out was worrisome. Fortunately, the process went well even though it was done over a utility sink rather than a proper work bench. Using a scratch awl to mark the center of each gear was done long ago and a good idea.

Gear with center cut out

The hole saw cut a larger diameter hole than expected. This could be due to a couple things. First, the offset teeth of the saw were intended to cut a hole larger than the diameter of the drum. Second, there was wobbling due to an unstable work surface and that could have bored out the hole more than intended. Third, measurements from the last cut may have been inaccurate.

Poor fit between the gear and the hub

Four hubs total will be used in the project. One of the hubs had been printed so the remaining three can be printed to match the actual size of the hole cut. It could be possible to get the hub close to the center of the gear by estimation but with a 3D printer available there's no reason each hub cannot be custom printed for that gear. A quick measurement was taken on the gear and a new hub was printed. The new hub fit without wobbling.

Custom printed hub for a 300mm diameter gear


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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-19 (W)

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

2016-10-18 (Tu) Clockwork Theremin

Four changes were made to the spoked hub print.
  • The ledge where the screws attach was made wider.
  • The screw holes were moved closer to the rim.
  • The screw holes were enlarged
  • The bearing socket was enlarged to account for printer slop.

Hub print

The edge of the hole cutting saw and the edge of the hub lined up nicely. There was a poorly named variable in the program which caused the rim to be larger than intended. Modeling this version came out better since the program was revised to make the variable more appropriate.

Edge alignment of the send hub print


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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-18 (Tu)

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

2016-10-17 (M) Clockwork Theremin

A hole cutting saw drill set was purchased to make sockets for the spoked hubs. The purpose was to make a 5" (127mm) diameter hole in each gear then use short screws to attach the two. Both pieces of plastic could be painted as long as the bearing socket was not contaminated.

 Hole saw and spoked hub

Sizes didn't match the saw diameter and the hub diameter. The hole saw was less than five inches while the hub was more than five inches. Since the size of the hub was adjustable, easily, that will be changed in the next print.

 Measuring hub diameter

In order to utilize the print hub, a comically large arrow was cut from scrap wood. This spinner could be used for a fun project like a random task selector or a carnival fun wheel. Its purpose was to perform an install with the available parts. A hole was cut with the hole saw then sanded to size as well as possible with a spindle sander. Several problems with the hub were found, which should be easily correctable. These problems wouldn't have been found without the mock installation.

Spinner arrow

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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-10-17 (M)

Monday, October 17, 2016

2016-10-16 (Su) Clockwork Theremin

Two weeks ago, work on the Clockwork Theremin stopped so a belt sander could be built. The purpose of the belt sander was to save time on sanding and create a new project with general appeal. Well, it didn't move up the completion date of the Clockwork Theremin but holy buckets did it save time sanding.

Enough background.
----------

A procedure was established for sanding all the similar facing sides of the teeth so a routine could be established and the same cut could be made repeatedly. This procedure worked for gears of all sizes.

 Dust left by gray plastic gears

In one day, all but the two largest half-gears were sanded. It will probably take another day to sand the half-gears and add some finishing touches. Sanding these gears would have taken at least two days and several pieces of abrasive paper. More importantly, the sanding would have been tedious and a serious deterrent to completing the necessary work. Not to mention serious muscle strain.

Plastic and fiber dust under the sander

The gears were brushed off and stacked. Plastic and fiber gears were both sanded. One courteous member at the hack space was kind enough to give me a dust mask to protect from airborne particulates in the plastic and fiberboard.

Stack of sanded gears

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


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Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

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2016-10-16 (Su)