Wednesday, November 30, 2016

2016-11-29 (Tu) Clockwork Theremin

The first attempt at drilling a metal handy box was disastrous. In the end, the box was usable and accessible but it didn’t meet quality standards. A second box was purchased. This time the metal slugs were properly supported while drilling. Scrap wood was fastened into a vise and used to prop up the inside of the box. This put wood right under the slug to be drilled so no pressure was put on the box, only the slug.


Drilling handy box with wood support

Once starter holes were drilled, the step bit was used to cut through the slugs and the wood underneath. Holes were drilled to the appropriate size in the top, for the electrical connections and the side, for the switch.

Top drilled for connector

Side drilled for switch

The 14AWG motor leads had the molded end clipped off and the wires were soldered to the power connector. During the procedure, it escaped my mind to wire to the switch. Wire will have to be purchased in order to connect the switch so it will be ineffective until then. The handy box was mounted near the motor on the gear board.

Handy box mounted

Downloads:
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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-26 (Sa)

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

2016-11-28 (M) Clockwork Theremin

Shelf brackets were purchased to act as floor stands. Four were going to be purchased for each gear board so two could be put in front and two could be put in back. This way the gear board would be unlikely to tip. Only two were purchased since brackets on the front would interfere with the gears. The brackets were aligned using a nearby piece of lumber while the gear board and bracket were held on a table. Holes were marked and drilled.

Aligning the shelf bracket

The brackets were added with #10 (5mm) bolts. Wingnuts were used in place of standard nuts so the brackets could be removed for transport. Weight was added to the bracket to keep the gear board from tipping over. This method isn’t elegant but the backside of the gear board shouldn’t be visible during operation.

Shelf bracket with heavy rod

Once the brackets were added the board was stood up. The weight of the motor helped balance everything but it was unstable without weights holding it in place. Ultimately, this should be a suitable way to present the gears.

Gear board standing upright

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The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-26 (Sa)

Monday, November 28, 2016

2016-11-27 (Su) Clockwork Theremin

Connections for the potentiometer were decided. The available wire colors were arbitrarily chosen for the connections. The connections will have to be maintained on the control side.

Connection list for stereo potentiometer

Wires were soldered to each terminal according to the wiring diagram. No insulation was used on the wires which may be changed later. No dangerous voltage will be seen on this device.

Wired potentiometer

The position of the potentiometer will be a factor of the length of the bolt from the final gear, the mounting plate, the potentiometer shaft and available screw lengths. For the sake of being portable, it would be preferable to keep the potentiometer as close to the gear board as possible.



Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-23 (W)

Sunday, November 27, 2016

2016-11-26 (Sa) Clockwork Theremin

Multi-conductor cable was salvaged for the project. This cable was purchased with the intention of repurposing the strands for projects since each wire was uniquely color-coded and easily tinned. A 20" (50cm) section was cut away and the sheathing was stripped. Seven wires were selected, five were randomly selected and the black and white wires were specifically chosen. These seven wires will be the low-voltage and signal wires.

 Salvaged cable

An RJ45 surface-mount box was purchased since it provided enough terminals and RJ45 wires could be ordered with shielding. The shielding shouldn't be important since it will be far from the motor. The box wasn't shielded anyway. All seven wires were stripped at one end and put under a screw terminal.

 RJ45 box with wires

 The box was mounted to the back of the gear board with the included mounting adhesive. No significant strain should be put on the box so the adhesive was considered sufficient. If it becomes a problem the box can be remounted with mechanical means such as bolts.

Mounted RJ45 box

A list was made to document where each wire was landed in the RJ45 box. A corresponding list was made to document which wire served which purpose. It will not be necessary to use the same color-coding on the wires in the control console but the wires preinstalled in the RJ45 box must align.

Wiring list for low-voltage

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-22 (Tu)

Saturday, November 26, 2016

2016-11-25 (F) Weekly Summary

Episode thirteen of our podcast may be the most important so far. It was one of the most fun to record and Tim and I are extremely proud of this episode. If you have wanted a good jumping-on episode for the podcast, this is it. Check out Episode Thirteen as we talk about WHY we biohack.


Tim has the robo-clamper hand

A high-power motor was selected but it didn't have a convenient mounting system. Last week, some adapters were made to mount the motor face flush with the gear board but the height was wrong. Fortunately, a simple raised platform was all that was necessary to bring the motor and gear to the correct height. A adapter was made from hardboard, the same material as the gear board.

Adapter ring for the motor mount

Four videos were taken which showed the results of different power supplies as they drove the motor. Two out of the four moved the motor but only a batter, with virtually unlimited available current, was able to move the motor well. The initial amp draw of the motor was difficult to measure and motors have a high inrush current.

Video of the battery driving the motor

A convenient mounting box for the motor was made from an electrical handy box by drilling holes in the top and side for a switch and two-position connector. The holes were drilled with a step bit but it caused the sides of the box to buckle a bit.

Handy box for the motor

Wires for the low-voltage half of the project were run to an RJ45 surface-mount box. RJ45 has eight connections and only seven were needed for the project. Shielded wires can also be purchased easily but the box was and loose wires were not shielded so it was not a perfect design.

Surface-mount RJ45 box with loose wires




 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by  Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, November 25, 2016

2016-11-24 (Th) Clockwork Theremin

A single-gang metal electrical box, handy box, was purchased to house the motor controls. These electrical enclosures were inexpensive and great for surface mounted applications where they aren’t seen. Motor leads will come through the bottom and held with a cable clamp. One side will have an On-Off toggle switch. The top will have the two-pole motor connector for power from the control console. Pilot holes and then 1/4” holes were drilled into the top and side.

Handy box with starter holes

A step drill bit was used to drill holes large enough for the connector and switch. Step drill bits were perfect for this kind of work when drilling is going through thin metal or plastic. Unfortunately, the force used to drill the holes put unwanted bends in the metal. Handy box sides were not meant for drilling.

Handy box with components installed

The connector and switch were loosely mounted on the handy box. The switch was only rated for AC so switching during a high DC current load would damage the switch quickly. A label was printed to warn about switching while under load. This switch was mostly placed for convenience and safety while testing. The second gear board may not have it.

Enclosure labeled and held near motor for mounting

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-21 (M)

Thursday, November 24, 2016

2016-11-23 (W) Clockwork Theremin

Many motors will have a nameplate that lists their Voltage (V), Full-Load Amperage (FLA), current type (AC or DC), if they're AC the nameplate will list the number of phases (PH or Φ) and other information for its application. The motors used in this project had a paper sticker with "12V" and nothing else so matching it with a power supply has been difficult. A terminal strip, a switch, and a current meter were hooked up so that different supplies could be tested.

Four videos were taken to demonstrate different 12V power supplies. The first video was to demonstrate a 3A power supply ordered specifically for this project. Two supplies were ordered with the intention of using one for each motor. These supplies were underpowered for the task. The motors drew more than the available three amps and this caused the little supply to "hiccup" ("hiccough") and temporarily go into a fault state. Then, the supply would reset itself and repeat the fault state.

Video demonstration of 3A open-frame power supply

The second power supply was only rated for two amps but it was a close-frame industrial power supply. This supply didn't fall into a fault state but it would not deliver more than two amps for longer than a second. When the motor was starved for power it would turn and eventually achieve maximum speed but it took a long time.

Video demonstration of 2A closed-frame power supply

A twelve-volt battery used to jump-start automobiles was connected to the circuit. The battery had no current limiting circuitry, or even a circuit breaker or fuse. As far as the little motor was concerned, there was infinite current available. This allowed the motor to start instantly and achieve maximum speed very quickly.

Video demonstration of 12V battery

Another open-frame power supply arrived before testing completed. This time, the power supply was rated for five amps which should have been enough to cover the draw seen by the meter previously. There was enough power to spin the motor but it had a slow uptake and the light on the power supply dimmed dangerously.

Video demonstration of 5A open-frame power supply

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-18 (F)

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

2016-11-22 (Tu) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone BONUS CONTENT


Episode thirteen was my favorite so far. It got to the heart of what biohacking is about and it was a lot of fun to record. After the recording session, Tim and I kept recording and we tried to do a "Why NOT?" episode where we talked about the dangers of biohacking. We didn't think it was worth a second episode but it was good stuff so we're releasing the uncut audio as bonus content. This way it doesn't screw up the publication dates and everyone gets a second helping of cyborgs this weekend.

Tim is the one with wires in his head


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-10-03 (M)

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

2016-11-21 (M) Clockwork Theremin

 A wide disc of hardboard (HDF) was cut in a rough circle on a band saw. The circle was refined on a sander. First, the sloppy edges were taken down to the edge of the circle. Second, the whole disc was spun on the belt sander to wear off the uneven edges. This technique allowed for larger circles than possible with a hole saw. It was shown to me by another hack space member who happened to be making wooden discs as well.

Circle cut from hardboard

Once a good disc was formed a hole cutting drill bit was used to remove the inner area for the motor. This was the same bit used previously when a hole was cut in the gear board. Fortunately, no one had adjusted it since it was used. The disc was clamped down and cut from both sides to reduce hole blowout.

 Cutting inner part of motor riser plate

The hollow disc felt like a frisbee so I managed to get a mid-air shot

The motor and the mending brace adapters were placed in the donut-shaped hardboard and holes were marked where the bolts would be placed. Those holes were dented with a scratch awl, given pilot holes, then drilled from both sides.

Drilling the adapter plate

All the bolts aligned and the plate, motor, and gear were fastened back on the board. The increase of 1/4" (6mm) was enought make the gear teeth mesh together. Power was applied but there was no appreciable motion. This was hopefully due to the power supply which was rated for 2A. The motor drew 1.4A unloaded. Another power supply should be tested soon.

Gear board with motor on the adapter plate

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-17 (Th)

Monday, November 21, 2016

2016-11-20 (Su) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone EPISODE 13


Editing was all wrapped up on episode thirteen. This time, editing was remarkably easy. There were more long monologues which were easier to edit than short clips. Tim and I spoke fluently and joked around more than usual. It was more fun to record and easier to edit than any other episode. Tim agreed that this made for an enjoyable episode.

Tim is the one with wires in his head


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-09-28 (W)

Sunday, November 20, 2016

2016-11-19 (Sa) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


Episode thirteen should have been our first episode because of the subject matter. Tim and I answered the question of WHY. "Why?" is the first question people ask when they meet a biohacker for the first time. I'm not complaining, I like curious people. Until Tim suggested doing this as a whole episode I accepted this question as part of the package rather than something that we could give reasons for.

Tim and I have some different reasons and some of our reasons are the same.

To date, I recommend listening to this episode above all the others and if you're new to the podcast I recommend you start here. Episode tomorrow!

I'm the one with clenched teeth


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-09-24 (Sa)

Saturday, November 19, 2016

2016-11-18 (F) Weekly Summary

Episode twelve followed the vein of electronics as they relate to grinders. This episode was about microcontrollers, specifically Arduino. Some other platforms like Picaxe and Raspberry Pi were mentioned but they weren't the focus. Microcontrollers have only been implanted a handful (pun intended) of times. While they can be power-hungry little devices, they're the best option for getting "smarts" under the skin. Check out Episode Twelve as we talk about them and what they mean to us.


I am the one giving a cyborg thumbs-up

My 1000th blog post was published on Tuesday. I commemorated the day by publishing x-rays of my hands to exemplify the point of how much I've changed since the blog started. Plus, hand x-rays to show my implants, were pretty cool.

Five implants appear as white blips

A lot of work was done on the gear board for the Clockwork Theremin. Motorizing everything has taken longer than I wanted. Printed gears had been made much earlier in order to actuate the first gear. With only the inertia of the printed gears and the small first gear decent motion was possible by simply holding the motor in place by hand.

Positioning motor by hand


Mending braces were purchased to hold the geared motor over the internal ring gear. These were simply straight plates of metal with premade countersunk holes. They can be found in a variety of sizes at many hardware stores and were inexpensive. Unfortunately, mounting the motor resulted in a poorly aligned fit.

Mending brace motor mount

There were several options for helping the motor and gears align. The braces could have been remounted. The holes in the braces could have been expanded. In the end, it seemed most logical to reprint the motor-mounted gear with a smaller one. This would also increase the torque and it meant there was no more need to cut or drill more parts. Three sizes were printed in the hope of finding a suitable diameter.

Experimental gear sizes

Even though the smallest gear was used, there was still not enough torque to drive the gears. This was a frustrating realization. A new motor was purchased. The motor, still a 12VDC motor, was four times the price and many times the size. Even the wires to this motor were massive in comparison to the first motor.

Upgraded motor next to original motor

The new motor meant that an entirely new method of actuating the gear would be necessary. This motor was considerably slower than the small motor and had more torque than I could stop with my bare hands. For these reasons, I decided to try mounting the first gear directly to the motor shaft. After some problems with the mounting bolt, a technique was found to attach the gear and motor. This involved another mending brace. The premade holes were used with screws which went through the gear and into a wooden receiving disc.

Gear fastened to mending brace

Instruments were mounted to the console face. Holes were drilled for all the components after aligning them as previously planned. A power switch was left off the plans since it used a rectangular base and cutting those is much more difficult than drilling a hole.

Console face

The new motor didn't have an obvious mounting method like bolt holes. Spacing considerations were taken and it seemed easiest to mount the motor with long mending braces, similar to the way the gear was attached to the shaft. Holes were drilled and tapped into the motor face which was aluminum (aluminium).

Drilling motor face


Tapping motor face

The long mending braces were attached to the motor face and a large hole was cut into the gear board. The mending braces kept the motor from falling through. Holes were marked on the gear board then drilled so bolts could hold the motor in place. The motor face was flush with the gear board. Unfortunately, the gears didn't match up so the motor position will have to be raised.

Motor installed on gear board




 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by  Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, November 18, 2016

2016-11-17 (Th) Clockwork Theremin

Holes in the motor face had already been measured and drilled. A #6 tap was used to complete the holes. The relatively small bolts were chosen since they should have no trouble fitting between the narrow recessed portions of the motor face. Tapping was done with machine oil. Extra care was taken with these motor since the face was aluminum (aluminium) and therefore softer than steel.

Tap wrench in motor face

3/4” #6 bolts had been purchased for this project. After the holes were tapped and blown clear of any chips, bolts were inserted to ensure they would hold. The bolts went in smoothly and held with no more wiggle than would be expected from a machine nut.

Bolts in motor face

A hole saw the size of the motor face couldn’t be found but a large circular hole was needed. The hack space provided a hole cutting bit with an adjustable arm. This adjustable arm allowed for infinitely custom diameters. Since the tolerances weren’t known, a test hole was cut in a scrap piece of hardboard. A second had to be cut when the hole was too large.

Motor in test hole

When the hole cutting drill bit was set to the correct size, the final hole was drilled into the gear board. It was important to keep the new hole centered on the old hole but the exact center had been obliterated before this. The center was estimated and the result was acceptable.

Hole cut in gear board

The modified motor was placed into the cut gear board. Four holes for mounting bolts were drilled where the straps landed. These holes were each marked with a scratch awl, given a pilot hole then drilled from both sides to avoid hole blowout. Ordinary #10 bolts and nuts were used to hold the straps in place.

Motor mounted on gear board

Unfortunately, the motor-mounted gear sat too low to meet the next gear so they don’t mesh. Forunately, it will be easier to raise the motor than to lower it. A space, made from plastic or wood will be cut and drilled to go between the gear board and motor mounts. Washers could be stacked between the gear board and motor mounts but it would more obtrusive.

Gears not meshing

Downloads:
Parts list:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?


Completed projects from year 1.

Completed projects from year 2.

Completed projects from year 3.


Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-11-15 (Tu)