Tuesday, January 31, 2017

2017-01-30 (M) Tough Pi-ano

All the necessary components were assembled and the reprogrammed cards were installed so it was finally time to test the function of the whole keyboard. All the Pi Zeros powered up properly. There was still static on the audio line so a ferrite filter was used on the final audio output line. There were problems with two of the octaves, one had a non-working button and another had two buttons which played together.

The non-working button was caused by a soldered wire that had come loose. The buttons which played together was caused by a pair of resistors which had come off their grounded terminal. Each problem was promptly fixed with a soldering iron then tested well.

 First note on problematic keys

Second note on problematic keys


Wires on the underside of the Pi-ano were unruly. Many tie blocks and zip ties were used to get the wires into a reasonable configuration. Keeping them tidy, or at least stationary, was important to getting the Pi-ano ready for transport. The USB hub was arranged so the power cable could come into the side without binding. The sound cables were longer and needed to be reeled up. The audio hub was placed near the edge and an audio extension cable with a filter was attached so external speakers could be connected. External speakers have the advantage of being replaced by the user and the volume can be controlled easily. This also takes away the burden of adding speakers and an amplifier.

Wire harnessing for power cables

Wire harnessing for audio cables

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-26 (Th)

Monday, January 30, 2017

2017-01-29 (Su) Tough Pi-ano

Raspberry Pi Zeros were installed in the Pi-ano. Wires from the data and power ports were routed around the arcade buttons and neatly tied up with tie blocks and zip ties. This type of wire fastening was learned from my years of industrial panel assembly.

Pi data and power cables

Each Pi was wired up the same way and wires were fastened as neatly as possible. No labels were put on any of the cords before installation.

All computing electronics installed

Naturally, there were unexpected problems. Considerable static was noticeable on the audio line and none of the Pis would boot. The whole system was being powered by a 1.5Amp supply running to an inexpensive USB hub. A meter showed that the power running to the system was less than it should have been so some of Pis were not getting enough current to operate.

Meter used to measure current to the system

A replacement power supply was used. This supply used a coaxial connector to power the USB hub instead of running through the USB connector which may have been regulated. Two of the Pis booted and there was sound, still with static, but it was easy to see the difference an appropriate power supply made. Several tests were run on the Pis to see why they wouldn't output sound but it seemed to be a problem with the memory cards. When the cards were swapped from Pi to Pi, the problems followed to cards. The problematic cards were wiped and given a fresh install of the image.

Pi-ano with powered USB hub

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-24 (Tu)

Sunday, January 29, 2017

2017-01-28 (Sa) Tough Pi-ano

Every single wire was trimmed, fitted with a terminal, crimped, and installed on a switch. This was a time-consuming process and each wire was given attention because there was not much opportunity to duplicate work in an assembly-line fashion the same way when building the boards.

Wires being given crimp ends


Entire board wired up to switches

A 1x12 board was cut to length to form a base for the Pi-ano. Doubling the depth should provide more than enough room for all the components on the inside. It may be possible to trim the whole back end with a single saw pass to gain a totally flush end.

1x12 lumber cut as a bottom for the Pi-ano

Risers were cut for the rear segment. Another piece of 1x6 lumber will have to be purchased for the back side of the Pi-ano. Each riser was made the same way as the front risers. Similarly, they will attach to the base in the same way, with a wood insert nut.

Rear risers with screws installed

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-17 (Tu)

Saturday, January 28, 2017

2017-01-27 (F) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone EPISODE 018


Editing for the Failures episode didn't take longer than usual but it was our longest episode. The reason for the length was the amount of material to cover. Normally shows take forty minutes to record and have to be rigorously edited. This time it was recorded in less than thirty minutes but not much had to be cut so the result was a show that was deceiving fast to record. Please enjoy the fluid speaking in this episode.

Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
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This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-10 (Sa)

Friday, January 27, 2017

2017-01-26 (Th) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


Every field has successes and failures. This episode focused on failed biohacks. Only a couple people were mentioned by name and the person who received the most attention was me. That's right, I know more about failed biohacks by failing at biohacks more than anyone else I know. One other person was mentioned but his project was brought up as one that will become a success someday.

Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-10 (Sa)

Thursday, January 26, 2017

2017-01-25 (W) Tough Pi-ano

All the adapter boards were installed. Each board was installed with a hammer, nails, and standoffs. Standoffs may not have been necessary but they do provide clearance for the wires. Attaching the boards with nails was not ideal since they cannot be taken out easily but screws that diameter were not readily available.

Adapter boards installed on board

Installation of the buttons was straight-forward. Each button was installed in the same orientation so wiring would be simple. Plastic nuts on each of the buttons were tightened with a specialty tool for attaching arcade buttons. This tool was invaluable when installing forty-eight buttons in row.

All buttons installed

Fifty switches arrived in the mail in time to be installed. They replaced the mismatched switches used during the interim. Installing each of them was a fast process since arcade buttons were designed to be quickly serviceable.

Replacing old switches

Since an image of the whole 8Gb card was recorded, it was a simple matter to make three more copies, one for each of the octaves. The file has yet to be uploaded.

Computers and programmed memory cards

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
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This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-14 (Sa)

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

2017-01-24 (Tu) Tough Pi-ano

The board with the neat resistors was copied twice. Since two usable boards had already been produced only two more were needed for a four-octave piano. Resistors were attached in the same pattern as the master board by simply making a note of which column needed a resistor and placing one. Each board was populated this way in a short period.

Top and bottom of boards 3 and 4

Once the resistors were in place, two sets of wire were cut and soldered in place. When the wires were in place a short piece of wire linked the solder pad with the wire to the solder pads with the header plug and the resistor. Creating the boards was actually a time-consuming process and rather tedious. Each board represented nearly an hour of work, none of which was very exciting. It actually took two days to get through everything.

Final boards with long wires

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-13 (F)

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

2017-01-23 (M) Tough Pi-ano

The first board made for the PiAno was messy since resistors were installed only after it was obvious they were needed. Four boards would be needed so creating one neatly would be important since it would be copied. The first board works well but it may be replaced if the copies are easy to produce.

While creating a neat board a few mistakes were made including some scorched vias where the soldering iron was too hot, misplaced wires, missing resistors, an off-center header socket,  and inadvertently filled vias. This board was abandoned. Ultimately, it was another case of starting the procedure without a good plan and getting distracted during the process.

Board with incorrectly placed wires and resistors

Another board was started with a clear plan; install the double-row header sockets, install all resistors, install a ground trace on each side of the board and install the wires last. This will leave less room for the thumbwheel switch but that doesn’t need to be installed close since it was also provided with pull-down resistors.

Neat board with resistors and header

Wiring was completed for the board by taking the wires from the error-ridden board and transposing them to the neat board. The most effective method for linking the header pin to the wire lead to the resistor was to solder them independently then lay a short piece of scrap wire between all three leads and heat it until the solder flowed between all three pads.

 Top of neat board

Troubleshooting was messy and unpredictable. Some of the problems that occurred in the first version, when there were no pull-down resistors, came back. Some of the notes would trigger randomly, the octave selecting thumbwheel was ineffective, and applying a voltage to a wire wouldn’t play a note. This was frustrating because the addition of the resistor was supposed to negate all these problems. A quick check with a mult-meter revealed that the resistors weren’t properly grounded. Once the grounding traces were added the problems disappeared and every connection tested well.

Underside of neat board

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-09 (M)

Monday, January 23, 2017

2017-01-22 (Su) Tough Pi-ano

One hole in the plastic was missed so it had to be drilled out. This hole was marked by placing the wood over it as a template and tracing the circle that was supposed to be cut. Drilling the hole, which previously relied on a center-mark, was estimated and drilled according to the edges of the drill bit. It turned out well.

Drilling the final hole from the plastic

Wood-insert nuts were purchased for this project. Holes were drilled for them previously but the nuts weren’t on hand. This type used a straight-blade screwdriver to put the nuts into the wood. A hex wrench version was also available. Next time the hex wrench versions will be used since it was difficult to guide the nuts along a perpendicular line while installing in soft wood.

Wood insert nuts installed

The sheet of plastic was trimmed to match the size of the button board. The type of plastic wasn’t identified when it was purchased but it could have been HDPE, High-Density PolyEthylene since the edges cut very smoothly but it wasn’t as pliable as nylon.

Plastic sheet trimmed down


Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-07 (Sa)

Sunday, January 22, 2017

2017-01-21 (Sa) Tough Pi-ano

An entire night of projecting was dedicated to debugging hardware problems with the PiAno. The first issue was that a note was played upon the release of a button. I had assumed this was a problem with the program, it was written awhile ago, and it was recognizing any change of state as a signal to play a note. If that were the case it would have been a relatively simple fix. In truth, it was even simpler than that but it's not really good news. The problem was the switches being used. Despite being high-quality switches, Cherry actually, there was a moment of chatter when they were released. All the switches currently installed came from on-hand stock and some of them were a different model which did not have the problem. Different switches were used and the problem disappeared so the issue was the switches.

The second problem was that two buttons were triggering a pair of notes to be played. My first assumption was that there was a short between two of the terminals on the circuit board and this was a close guess. The problem was that two of the pull-down resistors were soldered together at a single ground terminal but they were not connected to ground. Once the paired terminals were grounded the problem was fixed.

Ungrounded resistor leads

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-05 (Th)

Saturday, January 21, 2017

2017-01-20 (F) Weekly Summary

Last weekend Tim described the brain chemical acetylcholine and how it related to hacking learning and memory. There were a lot more technical terms in that show than most previous shows.


Brian - Left. Tim - Right.

Long wooden keys were revised to be closer to actual piano key dimensions. The weighting from such slender pieces was difficult to make them return to a resting position without springs.

Slender wood keys


Working with the thin wood was expensive and didn't provide enough benefit. The purpose of the instrument was never to appeal to professional pianists so less expensive wood was chosen. Wider keys seemed acceptable since they still looked like piano keys even if they were a chunkier version.

Using gravity return on some of the piano keys

A huge revision to the project happened when the decision was made to use arcade buttons instead of keys. This change was made after talking to someone who works closely with kids in music therapy. Since the shape of the switches wasn't important rugged arcade buttons seemed like a good choice. They are readily available, easily replaceable by untrained people, inexpensive and meant to take a lot of abuse.

A CAD drawing was made with the layout for a single octave then printed four times. Four octaves worth of arcade buttons came to nearly four feet (1.3m). White and black buttons could be used to make it clear that a piano sound would come out of the device when the buttons were pressed although this was merely a matter of style on my part more than functionality.

Marking the center holes from the CAD print

The holes were drilled to arcade button size in a piece of 1x6 lumber and a piece of plastic long enough to cover all the buttons. Plastic was purchased locally from a surplus store. Presumably, the plastic was HDPE (High-Density PolyEthylene). Covering the wood with plastic was to prevent slivers and give it a clean look to match the plastic buttons.

Drilled wood and plastic

Programming for the Raspberry Pi Zeros was done awhile ago and tested with simple tactile switches. It would have been possible to solder each arcade button to the Pi itself but an adapter board seemed like a cleaner option. This way a replacement Pi could be installed by anyone capable of soldering a 2x20 header strip to the board and probably by just using a computer from the full-fledged line of Raspberry Pis.

Raspberry Pi Zero installed on an adapter board made for the Tough PiAno

After the adapter board was made the testing was very troublesome. The notes would not stop playing. Nothing was done to ground the wires so they were all "floating" and highly prone to interference. A short video was taken to demonstrate the effects of floating wires.

Video demonstration of floating signal wires

A revision to the adapter board would be necessary. The first testing was done with short wires so floating wires were less of an issue but long wires each acted as an antenna.

A diagram was sketched which linked each of the Raspberry Pi Zero's pins to the correct arcade button. The switches were still drawn as piano keys for clarity. Pins for the octave selector wheel were also drawn.

Old testing board and key schematic

Pull-down resistors were added to the first board wherever they could fit. It was not a clean solution but the solder joints were thick enough to keep things in place. The next three copies of the board, one for each octave, would have the resistors taken into account before constructing.

Resistor haphazardly connected to adapter board

When the resistors were installed the board was mounted in the middle of one octave in the Tough PiAno. All the wires were trimmed and terminals were crimped to each end. The wire colors were arbitrary but recorded on the schematic sheet so they could be duplicated in the rest of the octaves. Switches were taken from stock so they don't match.

Switches wired in place

Testing was done on the adapter board by connecting a Raspberry Pi Zero with the Tough PiAno software running. Some of the switches performed unreliably so hopefully the switches that were ordered are all functional when they arrive.

One octave of buttons in wood

A wooden base was built on three sides. The base will give everything room on the inside. It will be held to a wooden shelf underneath by using bolts from the underside which will couple into threaded wood inserts.

Wooden base built around button board




 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by  Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, January 20, 2017

2017-01-19 (Th) Tough Pi-ano

1x2 (19mm x 38mm) lumber was purchased to raise the button board and provide room underneath for mounting the electrical hardware. The plan was to raise the keyboard 1 ½” (38mm) then mount it to a sturdy shelf. The shelf will probably be build from ordinary lumber but it could be purchased as a ready-made structure. Durability is key to the shelf. Lumber was cut to the dimensions of the button board since it been shortened to remove the rough ends and accommodate the space for the buttons.

Wood cut for front rail


Side pieces were cut from a second piece of 1x2. These were also for raising button board and protecting the elecronics inside. There was no piece cut for the back. Behind the button board another raise portion will be built. This will house the electronics not specific to a single octave such as the USB hub, amplifier and possibly speakers. Likely, external speakers will be used.

Side pieces cut to length

All the pieces were installed on the button board. 2” (50mm) screws were used to hold the pieces together. The side pieces were all drilled with holes large enough to fit some wood insert nuts. These weren’t stocked so they couldn’t be installed right away.

Side board installed
Base fully installed

Downloads

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-04 (W)

Thursday, January 19, 2017

2017-01-18 (W) Tough Pi-ano

The prototyping circuit board was mounted to the bottom of the wooden keyboard. Screws couldn't be found in the correct size so small wire brads (little nails) were used. Normally, nails wouldn't be used but they were the best available option. Screws would have been preferable.

Mounted circuit board

All the buttons for a single octave were temporarily mounted. The correct colors were even selected. On-hand switches had to be used but they were all compatible with the arcade buttons.

Switches and buttons

Wires from the circuit board were trimmed and connectors were crimped onto the ends. Careful attention was given to the wire length to avoid unnecessary tangles in the wire. All of the common switch connections were daisy-chained together and connected to 3.3V from the Raspberry Pie.

Buttons fully wired

This pattern of building a circuit board, wiring out to buttons, installing hardware and testing can be repeated for the next three octaves. Changes will be made to improve the process. A change needs to be made to the code since the notes also played when a button was released. This could be a matter of debouncing or simply checking that a button has been pressed for at least x milliseconds.

Buttons mounted in wood

Downloads


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-02 (Su)