Thursday, January 19, 2017

2017-01-18 (W) Tough Pi-ano

The prototyping circuit board was mounted to the bottom of the wooden keyboard. Screws couldn't be found in the correct size so small wire brads (little nails) were used. Normally, nails wouldn't be used but they were the best available option. Screws would have been preferable.

Mounted circuit board

All the buttons for a single octave were temporarily mounted. The correct colors were even selected. On-hand switches had to be used but they were all compatible with the arcade buttons.

Switches and buttons

Wires from the circuit board were trimmed and connectors were crimped onto the ends. Careful attention was given to the wire length to avoid unnecessary tangles in the wire. All of the common switch connections were daisy-chained together and connected to 3.3V from the Raspberry Pie.

Buttons fully wired

This pattern of building a circuit board, wiring out to buttons, installing hardware and testing can be repeated for the next three octaves. Changes will be made to improve the process. A change needs to be made to the code since the notes also played when a button was released. This could be a matter of debouncing or simply checking that a button has been pressed for at least x milliseconds.

Buttons mounted in wood

Downloads


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-02 (Su)

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

2017-01-17 (Tu) Tough Pi-ano

Sixteen pull-down resistors were selected from stock. They were ordinary 1/2 watt 10K Ohm through-hole resistors. Aka, those little dogbone-shaped thingers with the colored rings. Four of the resistors were used on the thumbwheel terminals and the remaining twelve were used for the piano octave.

 Topside of board

Resistors were added tot he top and bottom of the board. No room was left for these resistors when the parts were laid out so it was a mess to place all of them while maintaining a low clearance on the underside of the board. The next three boards should be much cleaner looking.

Underside of board

Downloads


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-31 (Sa)

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

2017-01-16 (M) Tough Pi-ano

A simple wiring diagram was sketched to show the connections between each position on the Raspberry Pie's GPIO and the corresponding piano key. Since the wiring was done on the underside of the board, which interfaces with the top of the Pie, all the connections looked just like the online diagrams of the GPIO.

Wiring diagram

Wires were run between the thumbwheel and GPIO pins. These were neatly terminated. Long wires were attached to the GPIO pins but left long since the distance to the keyboard buttons wasn't known.

Wires on underside of PiAno octave module

Wires were neatly bundled to keep them clear of the Pie when it gets connected to the board. Bundling also made the project look neater and also helped keep wires from twisting.

Wires on the other underside of PiAno octave module

To make it possible to run the correct wires to each keyboard button, wire colors were added to the diagram. In industrial engineering anyway, this is done with wire numbers on both ends of the wire.

Colors for each key in that octave

Everything was connected and the PiAno was allowed to boot. While holding the bundle of wires and computer cables there was only a wild cacophony of seemingly random piano notes. At first, it seemed as though all the switches were triggering simultaneously, which would suggest that the program was set to read logic LOW when it should have been looking for logic HIGH. When the project was set down but still operational, it silenced itself immediately.

When the breadboard prototype was built it only had short wires but this model had untrimmed wires nearly 1ft (30cm) long. Each of them acted as an antenna and was considered "floating." When my body was close enough to interfere with the floating signal it caused any nearby wire to go high enough to trigger. A video was shot to demonstrate the possibilities of using floating wires as a feature.

Pull-down resistors will have to be added.

Video demonstration of "floating" signal wires

Downloads


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-29 (Th)

Monday, January 16, 2017

2017-01-15 (Su) Tough Pi-ano

Each octave in the PiAno was meant to be replaceable so the programming has been done. Since this project will not likely be reproduced there's little point in optimizing this now. Ideally, there would be a better way to get the 48 key inputs to a Pi where it could play a note based on the input but the Pi Zeros were inexpensive so it seemed simplest to go this route and it shows the value of a modular based system which could be changed later to include a replaceable octave option.

Header pins were soldered to the Pi Zero in the same way they would appear on a full-featured Pi board. This does not ensure compatibility but it would be possible to alter the software, maybe not even necessary, to work with a full Pi board.

Header pins and header sockets soldered in place

The circuit board of a thumb-wheel switch was trimmed to remove unnecessary laminate which was obstructing how it would fit on the board. Unfortunately, this destroyed the razor saw blade.

Razor saw for cutting the excess plastic from a thumb-wheel board

After destroying  a saw blade, the header pins selected to go into the thumb-wheel switch wouldn't fit. Spacing on the switch was not the same pitch as the header pins, 0.1" (2.54mm). Instead of a simple job soldering header pins, short lengths of wire were cut, stripped, and tinned.

Short wires soldered to a thumb-wheel switch

All the parts were assembled to the board. This was only the first step in one octave module. Connections to the switches will have to be installed and connections to the thumb-wheel switch will have to be made. This was simply to mount the components. After one module is correctly wired, it will have to be copied three more times but the subsequent copies won't require figuring out the pattern.

Computer module for a PiAno octave

Downloads


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-27 (Tu)

Sunday, January 15, 2017

2017-01-14 (Sa) Tough Pi-ano

Pilot holes were drilled through each of the marked holes. These pilot holes started in the top of the board where the buttons will be visible so even if the holes were not drilled straight they should start in the correct location and the buttons would be positioned correctly. With such large holes and plenty of wiggle room there was no need for this level of precision but it was worth doing correctly.

Pilot holes drilled in wooden board

Every single one of the holes would be drilled from each face of the board to prevent blowout. This can also be done by drilling into a receiving piece of wood but that tends to chew up scrap wood pretty quickly with such large holes.

Holes drilled halfway through board

The same Forstner drill bit was used to drill through the plastic. Drilling plastic, probably PVC, with a Forstner bit meant it had to be cleared often. As the bit heated up it needed to be cleaned after every hole. Dipping the bit up and down while drilling also helped to keep the sides of the bit clear and lead to cleaner edges of the hole.

 Holes drilled through plastic sheet and wood

Only one hole was missed my accident. A half-note was missed but it should be no problem to make it up on the drill press next time. Accurate measurements produced wood and plastic which lined up well. The selected buttons were long enough to pass all the way through the board and plastic and still have enough exposed threads to catch the nut on the inside.

 Wood and plastic drilled

Considerable dust and debris was produced. Always keep your work space tidy! Especially when working in a community space.

Mess under the drill press


Downloads

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-22 (Th)

Saturday, January 14, 2017

2017-01-13 (F) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone EPISODE 017


Editing for episode seventeen went well. There was no awful echo to contend with. Listening to the show days after it had been recorded was valuable for absorbing the information we talked about. While recording I have to think about my own part in the show so I can't give my full attention to listening. Although I'm usually pretty hyped up on caffeine so there's no shortage of energy. I hope you enjoy our show about the brain chemical acetylcholine.

Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-10 (Sa)

Friday, January 13, 2017

2017-01-12 (Th) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


Some episodes focus on one host or the other. This episode focused on Tim and his encyclopedic knowledge of brain chemistry as it related to nootropics. We focused on the brain chemical acetylcholine and I learned a lot by listening. We even found a simple "recipe" people can do at home without any fancy ingredients or equipment. Hint, poultry farmers will have an advantage.

Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2016-12-10 (Sa)