Saturday, February 25, 2017

2017-02-24 (F) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone EPISODE 020


As promised, we're releasing our Religion and Biohacking episode today. Tim and I both found that we got a little worked up talking about this, even though he and I have a similar stance. With that said, this will be our last episode that doesn't have an explicit rating. We'll get into the reason for that in a couple weeks.

Maybe the most important thing about this episode is that I issued an open invitation to a religious scholar who is opposed to implants. I would love to have a conversation with someone about this.
Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-14 (Sa)

Friday, February 24, 2017

2017-02-23 (Th) 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone


*Dramatic Gulp*
We waited a long time to do this episode. We finally approached the subject of religion.
At first I thought it was going to be a touch subject, and it gets a little hot at one point but with everything on the line, it went over really well. Stay tuned tomorrow to catch our nineteenth episode, Religion and Biohacking.

Maybe the most important thing about this episode is that I issued an open invitation to a religious scholar who is opposed to implants. I would love to have a conversation with someone about this.

Brian - Left _____ Tim - Right


Ad spot for 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-01-06 (Th)

Thursday, February 23, 2017

2017-11-22 (W) Touch Screen Pocket Watch

Another enclosure model was printed which increased the depth for the watch so the lid could close flush. In the previous model the thickness of the watch prevented the enclosure from fully closing, but just barely. Only the bottom half was changed to make it deeper. Only the bottom half was changed because it was responsible for pressing the button and pushing the watch deeper allowed the button to be pressed by the enclosure.

Old cover, feeler gauges, and new enclosure

Spacing problems became evident when the watch button could not be pressed. The watch would slide to the left as the integrated hinge pressed the button but also pushed the watch out of the way. Rather than reducing the width of the watch’s footprint two small bumpers were added to make room for the silicone flap which covers the watch’s charging port. The width of the bumpers was measured with metric feeler gauges.

New Model

Another print fixed the measurement and bumper issues so the watch fit nicely without excessive force and was held in place by friction alone. The hinge moved easily so a bolt with a nylon insert nut was tightened until the resistance was able to let the hinge move easily but stay in place and stay shut. The thumb recesses modeled earlier made opening the enclosure very simple.

Open enclosure with bumpers

Making the bottom of the enclosure deeper made room above the watch for a plastic sheet to be inserted which will protect the screen from being scratched. The watch was not meant to be operated while the cover was closed.

Closed enclosure

Open

Downloads for Touch Screen Pocket Watch
To do:
  • Buy pocket watch chain
  • Model part to attach chain
  • Attach chain
  • Paint outside
  • Write Instructions on HaD

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-11-24 (Tu)

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

2017-02-21 (Tu) Touch Screen Pocket Watch

Hinge prongs were shrunk to account for printing slop. The resulting print fit together with some friction and demonstrated the need to have each half of the enclosure modified so finger could get purchase in order to open. Hinge alignment was good and a #6 (3.5mm) bolt could pass through the hinges. A drill bit was twisted through to smooth the holes but minimal plastic was removed.

Bolt through hinge

An animation was created to show the accuracy with which the hinges operated. No bolt was inserted during the animation, only part mating kept the halves aligned.

Hinge animation

Measurements were taken from the smart watch to be integrated into this project. The chosen watch was inexpensive and boasted compatibility with many mobile phones. Measurements would be to fit the phone into the enclosure so that the watch would fit firmly and be held in place by friction while the other side could be opened to reveal the watch in order to be operated and closed to protect it.

Taking watch measurements. More than one was taken, of course

A new model was created which had both halves included. Modeling both halves in the same workspace allowed differences to made since the two halves will no longer be identical as they were during the hinge testing phase. This also makes printing easier since there will only be one model to import. The model was improved by adding a window for the screen which will likely have a piece of polycarbonate glued in place. The top also has a recessed area for the thumb so it can be pulled away from the bottom. The bottom has two recessed areas so it can be pulled away from the top. This version was not intended to be spring-loaded like a traditional pocket watch. My emblem, the S shaped symbol, was removed from the bottom to add style. Upon completion of this project the OpenSCAD files will be released so anyone can remove this symbol if they don’t want it on their model. The thickness of the halves was also reduced so the final print will not be as thick. A living hinge was built into the bottom so the user can press the button easily by squeezing the side of the enclosure.

Improved model with several features

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-11-23 (M)

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

2017-11-20 (M) Touch Screen Pocket Watch

After printing a single copy of the model the unnecessary plastic used to fill the center of the watch halves was modeled out. The majority of the model, anything not touching the hinges, could have been eliminated too but the prototype halves may become useful for other projects or just fun to give away.

Rotating model

Printing at full resolution revealed a problem. The slightly discrepancy of the printer made the hinges marginally wider than the model but since they were printed to mate exactly the discrepancy made it too difficult to put the hinges together. These tolerances will have to be corrected in the next version. Two options exist, one is to move the hinges further apart than they are now and the second option is to shrink the hinges in place so they conform the desired width after printing.

Printing tolerances won't allow hinges to mate

Force was used to put the hinges together. They locked together. Another unforeseen problem was the hinges which had a square corner on the part which extended above the face. Corners such as these would never allow the hinge to function properly since the caps would hit instead of hinging. Hinges should be nothing more than the circles on the plane above the hinges centerline.

Hinges forced together

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-11-19 (Th)

Monday, February 20, 2017

2017-02-19 (Su) Touch Screen Pocket Watch

My first attempt at making a smart pocket watch didn't go too well. I was pleased with the level of craftsmanship but the hardware, a first gen Sony smart watch, was not a good choice. One problem was the battery life on the watch which died after a couple hours. I'm not exaggerating; this watch didn't last until lunch. Putting the touch screen behind glass was also setting myself up for trouble. With more time and effort I probably could have made something work, I have confidence in myself, but it would have been wasted time.

My projects generally fall into two categories. The first category is repeatable projects which people can order materials and follow the steps to make their own exact copy. For the second category I've used the phrase scrapheap engineering. These projects were built with whatever I could find in my apartment. Generally I HATE seeing these projects. I've come across Instructables where people have found a piece of broken equipment, like a huge pen plotter, and written instructions for how to convert it to a tea server or something. Nope, the odds of finding the same equipment to repeat the process are as good as zero. If someone sees something cool on my site I want them to be able to build it themselves. If I'm lucky they will plus their own spin on the idea and improve but at a MINIMUM someone should be able to copy a project exactly.

I'm ranting and I don't care.

Open source hardware and open source software is great because it opens the door for people to springboard off the work of someone else and make improvements. Taking hard-to-find hardware and turning it into something cheap is fine and good for someone who desperately needs a robotic tea server and HAPPENS to have a broken pen plotter but it doesn't apply to anyone else.

That's how I feel about my first attempt at the smart pocket watch. It used difficult-to-find hardware, it was outdated hardware, and the steps made it difficult to reproduce. Granted, this would have made it a very unique timepiece but that only goes so far in my mind. My experience with the first attempt helped me to see some things which should help me as I make another attempt at a smart pocket watch. I learned that you DON'T cover the screen of a smart watch. I learned that you don't surround the watch in metal. I learned that hinges need to be held tightly. I learned that pressing buttons through plastic is difficult. I learned that modeling paint applies really well and looks nice.

Enough background.
----------

A clamshell design was sketched on paper. The traditional pocket watch shape was going to be copied while making changes for 3D printing. The most obvious change was an increase in hinge size. Metal pocket watches can use small metal hinges but for the hinge to be purely plastic it must be larger. Holes in the hinge were made to accept a #6 bolt which was roughly 4mm in diameter.


Paper sketch

The drawing was modeled with OpenSCAD. Only two parametric variables were used. These were values the user could input to change the characteristics of the model. For example, the radius of the clamshell could be changed from 12mm (1/2 inch) to 50mm (2 inches) with one variable and the bolt hole diameter would stay the same. Or, the bolt radius could be changed from a bolt, 2mm (#6 bolt) to a pin 0.5mm without changing the size of the watch.

Rotating model view

Reasonable sizes were input, 15mm radius for the clamshell and 2mm radius for the bolt holes. Two halves were rendered and each half had five hinge prongs. Each prong was offset so when the two halves fit together the edges of the clamshell would align.

Printed version. Broken hinge can be seen in full resolution

After printing it was obvious the hinges would not be durable enough at this scale. The printer could not create solid hinges because of how thin the filament became upon extruding. The number of hinge prongs will be reduced and each hinge will become thicker. It would also help to print the design larger.

To do:
  • Change test model
    • Reduce hinge prongs from 5 to three
    • Increase proportion of hinge:clamshell
  • Measure smart watch
  • Device method to attach watch
    • Magnet?
    • Clamp?
    • Friction?
  • Create living hinge to press button
  • Access USB port while encased?

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-11-19 (Th)

Sunday, February 19, 2017

2017-02-18 (Sa) Dangerous Minds Podcast Interview COMPLETED

Dangerous Minds Podcast invited Tim and me to do a joint interview but Tim was overloaded at work so I accepted the invitation by myself. This was not my first interview or even my first interview with a podcast.

Dangerous Minds Podcasts is like 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone because they focus on the biohacker community but their format focuses on interviews rather than discussions. We had a lot to discuss before and after the interview. They appreciated my recording space where I modeled the head-mounted display for them. I appreciated their fluidity while recording. They had a wonderful method of making sure they didn’t speak over one another.

 Impromtu modeling

I started the interview a little wooden sounding but once we got a flow established it picked up. My interview was episode 27 and my definition of biohacking was used as the last interviewee clip in episode 29.

They used the off-air time to tell me about their new venture, Dangerous Minds University, where I now have a couple projects listed. Thank you DMP!

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.