Sunday, February 19, 2017

2017-02-18 (Sa) Dangerous Minds Podcast Interview COMPLETED

Dangerous Minds Podcast invited Tim and me to do a joint interview but Tim was overloaded at work so I accepted the invitation by myself. This was not my first interview or even my first interview with a podcast.

Dangerous Minds Podcasts is like 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone because they focus on the biohacker community but their format focuses on interviews rather than discussions. We had a lot to discuss before and after the interview. They appreciated my recording space where I modeled the head-mounted display for them. I appreciated their fluidity while recording. They had a wonderful method of making sure they didn’t speak over one another.

 Impromtu modeling

I started the interview a little wooden sounding but once we got a flow established it picked up. My interview was episode 27 and my definition of biohacking was used as the last interviewee clip in episode 29.

They used the off-air time to tell me about their new venture, Dangerous Minds University, where I now have a couple projects listed. Thank you DMP!

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

2017-02-17 (F) Weekly Summary

For the second time, we released an episode out of order. We recorded and released a show on the technological singularity because it was relevant to the news. The singularity was had been mentioned in 2xCb+Mic before and some of the same concepts came up in our AI episode. All of those can be found on our show page.

Tim has been working at a fevered pace to move our show to a new site. Before we just had a lowly page with the episode list but he's built us a whole site! As of this posting, it is under construction but all the episodes are there so have a look around.


Brian - Left. Tim - Right.

Why should mounting a screen to a pair of glasses present such a problem? It shouldn't. The whole process should only take a few minutes. Nope. Two weeks. It took two weeks, four machine screws, four nuts, and 200 lines of OpenSCAD code to create a wearable display. Sunglasses protect your eyes by blocking UV light but mine protected my eyes because I didn't leave the house during daylight hours for those two weeks. They're done, I look ridiculous, I can't wait to wear them in public.

Here's how it all wrapped up.

Small bumpers were printed for the holding the screen while being able to ride on threaded rods. This configuration was similar to an X-Y table found in CNC machines or 3D printers. Of course, only ordinary hardware store threaded rod was used instead of the expensive lead-screw type.

Parts for a simple screen holder which would use threaded rods

The parts were assembled and they fit exactly how I wanted. The threaded rods contained the screen at the top and bottom while the black bumpers contained the screen on the sides.

Screen holder on bolts for easy adjustment

Designing these parts was not easy. Modeling the parts took time and coding. Attaching the parts turned out to be impractical. Even though the parts amounted to a very low profile configuration, it was too large to fit on ordinary glasses.

Adjustable screen holder that didn't fit glasses

A second model was made with a completely different approach. This version would occlude one eye in order to create a flat disc that would be glued to the glasses. In my mind, this wouldn't be difficult to attach and it wouldn't be tough to print a few extra in case the alignment wasn't perfect. It turned out that the angle this attached made it almost impossible to see the screen. More versatility was needed.

Simplest possible screen holder

I assumed that most of the project would be learning about Linux and sourcing exciting new hardware. Nope. It's been all about aligning a screen. I was able to take a day to add some of that exciting hardware. A Red Bear IoT pHat was ordered at the recommendation of Doug Copeland of the Dangerous Minds Podcast. This added Wifi and BLE without consuming any USB ports but rather it relied on the GPIO.

Red Bear IoT pHat with Wifi and BLE

After all the failed attempts at creating a suitable mounting method, it became clear the best way to gain the kind of versatility I needed was to build a set of glasses from scratch. I don't wear glasses so I learned a lot by building bad pairs. SPOILER: I learned enough to make a workable screen holder.

The first print featured a screen holder that I learned to print days ago with the eye-occluding version. Even though it didn't work I found that I could reliably print a simple rectangle that would hold the screen steady. That day I also learned that glasses need both halves in order to sit on the face or they just fall off. In the picture, you can see me holding it at the bridge of my nose in order to keep them in place.

Right half of wearable screen holder

The second attempt featured glasses that went all the way across my face. What you can't see in the picture is the temples (I learned that was the name of the little shafts that go between the lenses and the ears) are simple straight rods.

Spectacles that were able to be worn

Ear hooks had to be added to the temples in order to keep everything from sliding down my nose. While the animation is fun to watch they weren't effective glasses.

Temples were the wrong length

The modularity of temples printed separately from the rest was valuable but reprinting the temples each time a few millimeters needed to be added or subtracted was impractical. Instead, the temples were printed very short and long threaded rods made it possible to change length with only a wrench and screwdriver.

Adjustable temples

Most of the work left was simply fine-tuning the model to fit my face. This was where a parametric model was highly valuable. Correcting the model took seconds. Rendering the model took minutes. Printing the new model took an hour.

Only minor tweaks remain

A flyby animation was recorded in order to show how all the printed parts fit together. My face acted as the product holder.

Face flyby

All the parts were finally suitable, printed, and assembled. A needlessly bright, cold light was pointed right at my face and I snapped a selfie while wearing everything. In one eye I could see a bright CFL lamp and the other was looking at a Linux desktop. Not a bad night.

Picture of the final product




 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by  Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, February 17, 2017

2017-02-16 (Th) Head-Mounted Display COMPLETED

When the bolts were picked to become the temple rods it seemed like a temporary choice of convenience but they have an interesting aesthetic so they may become permanent. Short bolts replaced the long temple bolts in order to achieve a better fit. It would have been possible to extend the long bolts out the front of the frames but since the bolts may become a permanent part of the spectacles it seemed more logical to replace them.

Side view of a single bolt holding each temple

A good fit seemed to be found with the short bolts and it was important that the glasses be easy to place and remove, which they were. Screen alignment was a problem but the point of making a parametric model was to make changes to the screen position through iterations.

Flyby of my face with the spectacles

Finally, all the parts were in place and a set of wearable frames had been printed. A poorly lit picture was taken while wearing the frames and staring at a bright light. During the picture, I was also wearing my 2 Cyborgs and a Microphone sweater.

I blame the lighting

The models were uploaded and can be found at the bottom of the page. My particular measurements were used for the STL model so if people want to adjust those settings they will need OpenSCAD and the parametric model.

Downloads:

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-02-15 (W)

Thursday, February 16, 2017

2017-02-15 (W) Head-Mounted Display

The goal of this project was to learn about Linux by forcing myself to use a Raspberry Pi daily. The secondary goal was to be able to walk and use a computer simultaneously. The unexpected, and so far sole accomplishment, has been teaching myself about the construction of eyeglasses.

All the adjustments were made in order to, hopefully, create a usable print of the glasses. The painstaking measurements and wild guesses have led to a frame with all the correct numbers in all the correct places.


Spinning model of glasses


Once printed, it was immediately apparent that the temples were the wrong length. They were so short that the ear hooks rode up and caused the viewer to lose alignment with the eyes. Instead of making attempt after attempt, which is time-consuming and expensive, ear hooks were printed extremely short so they could be attached with bolts.

 Bolt temples

 #6 bolts were used but 3mm bolts would work equally well. The holes in the temples were tapped to give the plastic threads. Only one of the bolts needed nuts in order to fasten securely while the second bolt provided tension without over straining the plastic. Available bolts were too long. They could have been trimmed but it was late so shorter bolts will replace them soon.

Side view of bolt temples

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-02-13 (M)

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

2017-02-14 (Tu) Head-Mounted Display

Temples with ear hooks were designed. Ear hooks were nothing more than a quarter of a ring. Since the edges were sharp right angles they will likely have to be sanded once the correct measurements are found. The temples were also shortened to account for the added length of the ear hooks.

Angles between the frame and temples were also changed but it is harder to see. A four-degree angle was taken from the face where the temple meets the frames. The angle of the screws also had to be changed. This angle will be adjustable for anyone with the code who may want the temples to press more firmly or lighter on the head.

Spinning model of temples with ear hooks

Once printed, the temples were attached to the frame. The four-degree angle was not readily noticeable and may be ineffective. A larger angle will probably be necessary.

Frames will ear hook temples

Measurements for the temple length and ear hooks were guesses all along so it was no surprise when the frames slid down. A stupid animation was made to show how far the glasses slid. Adjustments were measured by sketching pencil lines on my nose and measuring the difference. Fortunately, only one selfie made its way into this blog post.

Serious face in a silly animation

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-02-11 (Sa)

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

2017-02-13 (M) Head-Mounted Display

The centering distance had to be adjusted. At first, it seemed like it would be acceptable to look to the side in order to view the screen but it became apparent that wouldn't work for a few reasons. First, looking to the side will probably lead to walking with a turned head. Second, constantly turning the eyes will probably exhaust them quickly. Third, it would look ridiculous and uncomfortable and therefore not get used as much.

A caliper was used to measure the distance to move the viewer center. The screen was simply held up and slid along the printed frames while wearing them. The ideal location was found and held manually until the measurement could be taken.

Deciding how far to move the viewer

The print was made and temples were added. The three prints were aligned on a desk and photographed to show the differences. On the far left was the first single-eye print which could adjust the angle of the viewer. In the center was the previous iteration which had the correct angle but the viewer was too far to the outside of the field of vision. Lastly, on the far right, was the print which featured the viewer closer to the optical center where it was most easily viewable.

Once the position of the viewer was set it became apparent that the shape of the temples was not usable. Straight rods perpendicular to the front provided no traction to the head so they were highly prone to slipping. Correcting the issues with the temples will be the next step.

Timeline of frames

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-02-10 (F)

Monday, February 13, 2017

2017-02-12 (Su) Head-Mounted Display

Appropriate changes were made to the model to adjust the angle of the viewer Adding the extra degree of movement lead to the addition of several other adjustments including rotation of the viewer so the screen would appear crooked. That may be a necessary option for some people but this model will keep those variables set to zero.

Spinning model of viewer holder

The actual print of the glasses was useful for discovering that centering the viewer on the glasses frame was not centered on my eyeball. Of course, this may be different for everyone so code will be made available near the end of the project so all the adjustment will be available.

Off center viewer holder

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.
Completed projects from year 3.



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim property or assets based on a post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.


2017-02-09 (Th)