Sunday, April 19, 2015

2015-04-18 (Sa) Cyborg Distance Sensor

A schematic was drawn which uses a DPDT relay to alternate current to the stimulation coil. Parts were selected for the Power + Stimulation portion of the project. This portion is meant to hold the battery, relay, and coil. While selecting parts the idea of using a 3.5mm mono jack to connect the coil was used. Since the coil has not been made and several options exist the plug will make experimentation simple and should prevent any careless accidents from damaging the components.

Updated schematic for Power + Stimulation

Selected components for Power + Stimulation assembly

Soldered components from below

Soldered components from above

The 4xAA battery packs have switches built in so power switching was taken care of. During construction a 23A battery was decided upon instead due to it's size. A 23A battery provides 12V but is the same size as an N battery or roughly half the length of a AA battery with a slightly smaller diameter. They do not have a long life nor are they cheap but to demonstrate this project they are worth trying. Once assembled a battery was inserted to the holder and a stereo 3.5mm cord was run between the two assemblies to prove that power was being applied to the Sensor + Processing half.

23A battery holder soldered to relay and sockets
Powered components

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Assemble Power + Stimulation portion of project 
  • Make enclosure for Power + Stimulation portion
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-16 (Th)

Saturday, April 18, 2015

2015-04-17 (F) Weekly Summary

The Haptic Distance Sensor was quickly featured on Instructables. Instructions were written in a day using pictures from this blog. Instructables has drawn people to this blog more than any other place I've promoted my creations. With published instructions the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor was completed. A cyborg version similar to the Bottlense project by Grindhouse Wetware was started. This project was added to the Year 02 completed projects.


A single-day project was shown which was an OpenSCAD file which allowed a user to generate encoder wheels by simply entering a few measurements. Ideally the wheels would have also arranged themselves in an efficient order by using a second file but the arrangement was sloppy. Instead the file was released which allows a user to use ("use<encoderwheel.scad>") the file to generate single encoder wheels. This project was added to the Year 02 completed projects.


After completing the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor a similar version was started which was meant to be similar to the Bottlense project by Grindhouse Wetware. This version interacts with an implanted magnet. I have a magnet in my left ring finger and another one in my left index finger. This model was started to be able to demonstrate at Convergence 2015. I will be on a couple panels at Convergence this year. The enclosure for the Cyborg Distance Sensor was modified from the servo version. Schematics were drawn and feature a three position phone cable going between two components. The servo version relied on an external 5V battery to power everything. The cyborg version uses a coil of wire which will be excited by the power supply which may range from 6 to 16 volts. An onboard voltage regulator will supply the correct voltage to the microcontroller. The Sensing + Processing assembly was soldered but not yet programmed or tested.

Enclosure changes made from the servo version to the cyborg version

Schematic for Sensing + Processing

Schematic for Power + Stimulation

Soldered assembly for Sensing + Processing

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.




This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, April 17, 2015

2015-04-16 (Th) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Since modeling files between this project and the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor used some of the same optional OpenSCAD files the directories were kept the same so the links did not change and there was no need to duplicate the files. If someone were to download the Arduino code or the STL model it wouldn't make any difference since they are self-contained.

An attempt to download the Arduino code to an Adafruit Trinket was made on a Windows computer. It was unsuccessful. Ordinarily Arduinos which don't use serial converters are avoided since they can be more difficult to program. They cannot use serial print commands so debugging is more difficult since it must be done through a different program which emulates the serial port. The advantage to these devices is they can function as a mouse, keyboard or MIDI device and they are often less expensive than their serial equivalents. They do not require an external programming board unlike an Arduino Pro Mini.

Project connected with mini USB cable

Files for Cyborg Distance Sensor:
The OpenSCAD files below are not necessary unless you want to change something
To do:
  • Assemble Power + Stimulation part of project
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Make files public
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-15 (W)

Thursday, April 16, 2015

2015-04-15 (W) Cyborg Distance Sensor

An enclosure was printed and the headphone socket fit neatly but due to an oversight the chosen socket was a mono version instead of stereo. A replacement was found which had similar dimensions but the soldering posts were on part the face of the socket which presses against the enclosure. It may be suitable to glue it inside the enclosure with the soldering posts hidden and the socket slightly recessed. One of the previously printed lids was used instead of printing a new one. This lid had small raised portions to center it on the enclosure but the symbol was backward.

Enclosure with incorrect mono socket

The sensor-and-processing unit was soldered together. Connector pins were removed from the ultrasonic distance sensor and replaced with copper wires according to the schematic from 2015-04-14 (Tu). Wires were trimmed shorter than the previous project to conserve space inside the enclosure. Short leads resulted in a neat package. The device was not programmed or tested with power.

Soldered sensor-and-processing unit

To do:
  • Redesign "Power + Stimulation" schematic diagram
  • Buy parts:
    • Reed relay
    • 8 or 10 AAA battery holder
  • Solder project
  • Print enclosure
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Make files public
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-14 (Tu)

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

2015-04-14 (Tu) Cyborg Distance Sensor

Schematics were drawn for both parts of the project. The ultrasonic distance sensor and controller will be inside the 3D printed enclosure the same as the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor. The servo will not be a factor and incoming power will come into the BAT+ terminal so the onboard 150mA voltage regulator can utilize the 12-15VDC battery power.

Schematic for distance sensor and controller

A second schematic was drawn for the components which will provide power and stimulate the magnet. After drawing the schematic it seemed logical to rework the relay so power applied to the coil will alternate polarity rather than simply having power cut. This should provide a more noticeable sensation but will draw twice the power. Since a more complicated relay will be used the maximum frequency of the relay may become a factor. This can be found through testing.

Schematic for battery supply, relay, and coil

To do:
  • Draw schematics
  • Redesign "Power + Stimulation" schematic diagram
  • Buy parts:
    • Reed relay
    • 8 or 10 AAA battery holder
  • Solder project
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Make files public
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-13 (M)

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

2015-04-13 (M) Cyborg Distance Sensor

This project is very similar to the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor except that is is meant to vibrate an implanted magnet instead of turning a servo. This means that some problems arise and some advantages are gained. There are no moving parts aside from a reed relay but a larger power source is needed.

I am directly mimicking the Bottlense project by Grindhouse Wetware but this allows me to make my own modifications and understand the workings. Grindhouse Wetware has provided their project open-source.

Another major difference this project features is a hand-mounted component which will contain a battery supply, relay, and a wire coil to excite the magnet. Both parts will be connected through a simple 3.5mm 3-conductor phone cord. This is a typical wire seen on headphones so the cords and connectors are cheap and easy to obtain.

Cyborg Distance Sensor is meant exclusively for those implanted with biosafe magnets.

Enough background
----------

Remodeling was done on the enclosure to accommodate the change of parts. The servo mount was eliminated which made room for a larger symbol on the back. Thickness on the back lid was reduced. A large rectangular hole was made for the 3.5mm headphone socket after taking measurements from a piece used.


Animation of measurements taken

Changes to the enclosure

Code from the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor was modified so it could use a smaller microcontroller. Originally the Self Contained Haptic Distance Sensor used an Arduino Pro Mini but a smaller board is being substituted which uses an ATtiny85 based board. This board has only 5 I/O pins. Two have been reserved for data and the remaining three will be used for the discrete I/O used on this project. The code was written minimally, shown on the left half of the picture. After a minimal version of the code was written a more robust version was written which takes advantage of functions, spacing and comments. A version of the code could be written which outputs audible frequency rather than the low frequencies intended for a finger magnet.

Simple Vs robust code


To do:
  • Draw schematic
  • Buy parts:
    • Reed relay
    • 8 or 10 AAA battery holder
  • Solder project
  • Program
  • Test + Debug
  • Make files public
  • Write instructions

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-13 (M)

Monday, April 13, 2015

2015-04-12 (Su) Miscellaneous Layered 3D Printed Rotary Encoders COMPLETED

When tracking rotary position, like wheels on a robot, some kind of rotary encoder is used. These encoders may merely track the direction and speed of a wheel or they may be able to determine the absolute position as well as speed. They may read position by physically moving switches but many use optical sensors and a wheel, or multiple wheels, with spokes which interrupt the light. In place of spokes some sensors use a clear wheel with patches to interrupt light.

This project sought to create encoder wheels which could be stacked and each read with a simple photo interrupter. If multiple wheels were printed at different bit values (different fin counts) and stacked uniformly the absolute position could be determined by reading the values of the photo
interrupters.

Screenshot of rendered encoder wheels


Prebuilt rotary encoders are inexpensive so this project should serve to be instructive about the function of rotary encoders rather than a practical implementation. Although it is certainly possible to implement these devices.




OpenSCAD encoder generator file


More posts like this one have been arranged by date.

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-04-06 (M)