Saturday, February 28, 2015

2015-02-27 (F) Weekly Summary

The ESPeri.Impass disc shaped designs were finally satisfactory. The fist design was one which relied on a spinner with posts which would rest on the enclosure. The second design put the posts, or spikes, on the inside of the enclosure. Both of these were modeled in OpenSCAD.

Internal view of the divot spinner holder

Internal view of the spike spinner holder

A new project was introduced. This was an abandoned project which was restarted after being largely reworked. The first design relied on high quality prisms to split the view of a camera and retain image quality. This new design uses inexpensive acrylic prisms which are placed directly on a split screen with two camera views. The advantage of this design is that the prisms do not need good image fidelity since they are not transmitting any distance.

The video device chosen was a dashcam which used two cameras and could display the images side by side. The cameras were about the same distance apart as human eyes. Both cameras use identical lenses whereas some dashcams with two cameras have one side with a telescopic lens and the other without.

 Disassembled dashcam

The way the camera attached to a mount was not a standard 1/4-20 camera mount nor was an adapter provided. It was decided to build one using the 3D printer. This adapter could easily be made by buying and cutting a block of plastic or layering sheets of plastic or wood. The basic shape and dimensions were drawn by hand. After thinking on the design it was revised to split the design into three distinct parts. This was also sketched them modeled with OpenSCAD. The parts were not finalized.

 First design of adapter

Refined design of adapter with multiple pieces

Model of multiple pieces




The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, February 27, 2015

2015-02-26 (Th) Prismatic Stereoscopic Screen Viewer

The design for a stackable adapter was followed to make drawings of three pieces. The programming was done with as modularity as possible so measurements could be used across all pieces. The first piece, the Base piece, had the most complexity so it was created first. The goal was to have all components of the Base piece rendered properly and modify the subsequent pieces from that file.

 Base piece

When the first piece , the Base piece, seemed complete it was copied. The second copy was modified to replace the support arms with blank space. The third piece was just like the second but without a dais to act as a spacer. This last piece could have been a copy of the second piece to save work but it would have lead to an unnecessary bulge and a base that would be thicker than necessary.

Middle piece 

Top piece

The final file created was a combination of all three renderings. In retrospect there should have been only one file which would render all pieces simultaneously. This would allow for much smoother altering. If the pieces need to be modified this will be done. Mostly likely this will be the case since the long arms on the base are exactly the same size as the gaps in the other pieces. Mostly likely a gap will have to be programmed into the drawings to accommodate the fit.

All three pieces in a single file for exportation

To do:
  • Redesign part for 3D printing
  • Convert all three parts to a single drawing
  • Add a feature to increase the gap surrounding the support arms of the base
  • Print part
  • Test
  • Design part to attach to screen and hold prisms
  • Add lenses to prisms

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-14 (Sa)

Thursday, February 26, 2015

2015-02-25 (W) Prismatic Stereoscopic Screen Viewer

The holes of the first mount design would be prone to collapsing when printed vertically. The wings of the first design would be impossible to print horizontally. The conclusion was to print the mount in three pieces. Those pieces would be assembled by simply stacking them. Glue would be an option but not necessary. Each of the pieces can be printed with no sagging and the final piece will have circular holes printed by drawing circles on top of circles rather than layering from the side.

Three part design

If glue were to be used it would be possible to print three copies of the same piece and glue them together but this would be slightly wasteful. This design is more complex but should form a rigid piece which doesn't need glue or finicky assembly instructions.

To do:
  • Redesign part for 3D printing
  • Print part
  • Test
  • Design part to attach to screen and hold prisms
  • Add lenses to prisms

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-13 (F)

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

2015-02-24 (Tu) Prismatic Stereoscopic Screen Viewer

A simple part was designed to interface with the camera mount. This was a replica of the piece which normally contacts the camera mount but all the dimensions were generated by logical inference. The bottom part of the mount was intended to have a 5mm hole which would be tapped to have threads like those found on a typical (1/4-20) camera mount.

The design was not drawn to scale but measurements shown in green are what will be designed for. One issue may be printing circular holes which could lead to sagging of the print lines. The design should be revised.

Diagram of mount

To do:
  • Redesign part for 3D printing
  • Create To Do list

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-12 (Th)

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

2015-02-23 (M) Prismatic Stereoscopic Screen Viewer

This project is my chance to start sinking my teeth into the possibilities of owning a 3D printer. The option of printing custom pieces rather than trying to buy or build is pretty tempting and allows me to share some pretty neat projects with other people who have 3D printers. I'm excited.

Enough background.
----------

The original Prismatic Stereoscopic Camera Adapter hoped to split a camera's field of view into two different angles with a single camera but finding inexpensive optical quality prisms turned out to be impractical. The four prisms made in that project displayed a good image when used up close but suffered severe distortion when used at any distance. The project ended as a failure.

A new project with the same intention was started but instead of trying to split a single camera feed into two channels, like a smartphone, a battery powered dual camera dashcam was purchased where two camera channels were already placed on a single screen. The same prism array created in the Prismatic Stereoscopic Camera Adapter can be used but will instead redirect the images from the dashcam’s display.

 Fully assembled camera unit

Mounting bracket disassembled

Top mounting bracket, side view. Bracket will be copied

The first step will be to design a system for attaching the dashcam to a wearable head mount. The most sensitive piece will be the mating connector to part of the dashcam’s OEM mount.


The dashcam’s mount was disassembled so measurements could be taken. All measurements taken were in millimeters since the drafting program and 3D printer use millimeters as the default measurement system. A diagram was sketched where the measurements were transcribed so a mating piece can be made.

Top mounting bracket, front view

Bottom bracket. Needs mating piece designed

Dimensions on bottom bracket

To do:

  • Create To Do list


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-11 (W)

Monday, February 23, 2015

2015-02-22 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

The receptacles drawn previously were left in the program but commented out so they did not render. A new module was created which plugged the holes in the center of the enclosure halves and extended a cone from the plug. The purpose was to provide cones which could pinch a spinner in the center of the compass. The first picture was taken where the cone extends to the middle of the enclosure to demonstrate that the size of the cone can be changed like the second picture shows. The purpose to being able to change the height freely is so that copies can be modified easily as different spinners are introduced.

Maximum cone length

Modified cone length

Outside of enclosure

To do:
  • Design an enclosure with a cone to capture a spinner
  • Design spinner for spheroid compass
  • Design spinner mount for tubular compass
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-20 (F)

2015-02-21 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

The conical rests could potentially introduce a lot of friction. This would be caused by the edges of the spinner point rubbing against the cone walls. A sloped surface, like an ellipsoid may be preferable for the spinner rest. The spinner design will involve a magnet with a pin coming off of each side to rest on the enclosure. It may be beneficial to make an enclosure design with a cone coming from either side to hold a magnet spinner.

The first design was a hemispherical nub over the hole in the enclosure. This mass seemed excessive even though the most friction would take place at this point. The second design was a hemispheroid with the same proportions as the enclosure itself and this seemed like a better design.

External view of hemisphere design

External view of  hemispheroid design

Internal view of  hemispheroid design

The final design for a rounded spinner holder was a small sphere with a very small divot. This design may be difficult to get the spinner seated but it should provide a low friction and precise method of holding the spinner in place. The code for the spinner rests was commented out with notation that only one should be selected for the printing.

 External view of the small hemisphere design

Internal view of  hemispheroid design

Code showing code for both spinner rests

To do:
  • Design an enclosure with a cone to capture a spinner
  • Design hemispherical spinner rest
  • Design spinner for spheroid compass
  • Design spinner mount for tubular compass
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-19 (Th)

2015-02-20 (F) Weekly Summary

This week focused on the ESPeri.Impass. If you don't remember the name comes from combining the acrynym ESP (Extra Sensory Perception) with Peripheral then combing the words IMPlant and coMPASS This is meant to tell that the device will give a new sense related to the compass. There is a reason engineers don't get invited to advertising meetings.

There was some time spent with my 3D printer in Minnesota where I could change and test ideas on a whim and see them reflected almost immediately. The rest of the time I have been much too far away to print anything.

 Evolving shapes of the tube

Different tubes with magnets

While traveling I have been using OpenSCAD as a lightweight 3D drawing program. Some ideas I have had for the ESPeri.Impass were drawn over the week in anticipation of getting back to my printer. While drawing some other ideas came to me and drawings were refined. The tube design was refined nicely by adding a specially shaped "floor" which will hopefully cause a tap when facing north. The rest of the "floor" will be covered in a spongy material to damped the collision so no tap will be felt. The simple shape also provided an arrow on the outside to indicate which direction the frame is facing.

The shape of the "floor" in the  tube

External indicator arrow

One of the first designs for the ESPeri.Impass was a disc shaped design similar to a standard backpacking compass where the spinner can freely swing around. A suitable shape was made in OpenSCAD. Once the shell was made a lot of time was spent making different methods of holding the compass spinner. The first two designs were build around the idea of a compass spinner which would have supports built into it. The shape of the enclosure was modified so that small divots would hold the spinner in place.

 External view of a cone shaped  spinner holder

External view of a ellipsoid spinner holder

Internal view of the holder which used a divot

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, February 20, 2015

2015-02-19 (Th) ESPeri.Impass

The place for the compass spinner to rest was simply left as a hole which may be useful later but the first model will need divots. The first logical shape was a hollow cone. The cone will guide a spinner directly to the center which will ensure accurate positioning. The worry is that the steep, sharp edges of the cone will introduce a lot of friction. Ideally the spinner would be a sharp point meeting a blunt surface since the sharp point will not have a lot of friction, similar to an overturned tea cup balanced on a knitting needle.



External view of enclosure


Internal view of enclosure

The pictures taken for the blog were rendered directly from OpenSCAD rather than using screenshots. This provided a cleaner picture without the unnecessary code window and feedback window.

To do:
  • Design hemispherical spinner rest
  • Design spinner for spheroid compass
  • Design spinner mount for tubular compass
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-19 (Th)

Thursday, February 19, 2015

2015-02-18 (W) ESPeri.Impass

Another enclosure was sketched based on one of the first conceptualizations of the ESPeri.Impass. This model was shaped like a horizontal disc unlike the tubular design which was modeled recently. The disc shape and function is similar to a traditional needle compass where the spinner rotates freely on an axis. The obvious difference is this model will have no viewing window and feature a section of the internal shape which will encourage impact with the needle when in a particular orientation. In other words, this will be like a dollar store compass except the needle will bang around when it points north.

The disc design was not utilized because it presents an implanting problem. The tubular design is intuitively implantable in a leg because it will naturally want to position itself upright with the user. A disc shape will need to be implanted in a site where it will be held horizontal such as the top of a shoulder which would be inadvisable.

The shape of the compass started out as a hemisphere with a cone inside. The hemisphere will be the enclosure shape while the internal cone will be the area where the spinner can impact the enclosure. When the proportions looked correct the entire structure was scaled on the Z axis in order to provide a spheroid shape.


Hemisphere with internal cone 

Hemispheroid with flattened cone


Since many of the variables in the structure were declared at the beginning of the program tweaking the program to make a suitable looking enclosure and cone was relatively easy. Tabs were added so two copies of the hemispheroid could be printed and fastened together with small bolts.

 One half of enclosure

Outside of enclosure

To do:
  • Design spinner for spheroid compass
  • Design spinner mount for tubular compass
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-18 (W)

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

2015-02-17 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

The drawing from the previous night was used to draft the part in 3D. The very first idea was a complex method of including a cylinder, removing two cubes from it, then removing a smaller concentric cylinder. The second method was simpler and involved simply adding a cube, rotating then moving it a distance based on the Pythagorean theorem. Today the process was further simplified to a cube being rendered and a cylindrical portion of a corner was removed.

 Top view of original tube

The cube was added by first adding more variables to the top and rendering a cube with the declared variables. Since the bottom and center of the tube was at the origin the cube was positioned ideally by declaring that the center of the cube should not be used as the point of origin for the cube.  A cylindrical hole was removed from the corner of the cube which touched the center. This was all that was necessary to create the internal ledge/anvil and the external pointer.

Top view of added cube

External view of added cube

Internal view of cube with axle clearance

To do:
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Add direction arrow to base
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Design bottom for compass to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-16 (M)

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

2015-02-16 (M) ESPeri.Impass

An idea for the next compass tube was conceptualized. The basic concept was the have a cylinder in the bottom of the tube which had 3/4 of it's mass trimmed away like a pie then remove a cylindrical portion from the center as well. The next step would be to add an arrow on the base which indicated where the 1/4 pie was located inside. These would have been doable but unnecessarily difficult and time consuming.

First diagram

While sketching the first idea a simpler idea occurred. Instead of making a cylinder to fit inside the tube then cutting it away with two more pieces a simple cube could be added which would extend beyond the tube but that extension would act as a pointer instead of being trimmed away. A cylindrical piece would still be removed from the center to make room for the spinner's axle.

Top down view diagram for new spinner tube

To do:
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Add direction arrow to base
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Design bottom for compass to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-02-15 (Su)

Monday, February 16, 2015

2015-02-15 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

A tube and cap were printed. The tube was taller than any previous version. The cap's node was larger  than any previous version by 0.25mm. The cap fit securely in the tube and remained in place without any outside pressures. The goal with this model was to get a step closer to a self-contained working prototype which could be placed next to the skin to simulate implantation in terms of effect.

 New tube on right for comparison with old tube height

Noticeable gap difference between old and new design
Screw can be inserted further than old model to allow for more adjustability

The spinner had trouble staying in contact with the screw tip so the screw was replaced by a bolt since since the tip of the bolt was a plane instead of a point. The spinner stuck stuck to the bolt well but didn't release as easily as desired. A larger steel bearing may be the easiest solution. This would add weight to the spinner and add distance between the bolt and magnet.

To do:
  • Resize components
  • Reprint
  • Install larger bearing 
  • Cut/bend hanging bracket for spinner
  • Add direction arrow to base
  • Buy spongy material for spinner to land on
  • Design bottom for compass to land on
  • Test + Evaluate hanging tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

x2015-01-27 (Tu)