Thursday, December 31, 2015

2015-12-30 (W) ESPeri.Impass

Models were updated. The lid was changed to have a cone in place of a hemisphere. The screw hole was thickened to give it a collar which was meant to keep an inserted screw or bolt straight. Spinner design was heavily revised. Instead of a printed cap a new method was conceived. A thin brass strip will be glued over the top then dented upward to form a spot for the post to rest. This should reduce friction between the spinner and post. A metal insert into the post may also become necessary to further reduce friction.

Plastic use was reduced by eliminating unnecessary sides. The hemispherical look was gone but the balancing point should be the same. If a version is printed which uses a liquid medium the sides may be restored to reduce hydro resistance and unwanted currents.



Updated models spinning

Printed models

To do:
  • Lengthen screw hole collar
  • Change sphere to cone
  • Add shroud to enclose spinner
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-28 (M)

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

2015-12-29 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

A print was made which was rotated 180ยบ compared to the previous prints. Previous prints were made differently to ensure that the pivot point was printed on top and therefore would be less likely to have printer errors. Unfortunately this design was unable to print well in this orientation. Printer errors were easily noticeable and the print was unacceptable.

Printer anomalies on spinner

The spinner was split into two segments, the cap, which contained the pivot point, and the bottom which contained the magnets. This split ensured a clean surface on the pivot point and the area where the screw will pass over.

Printed with separated cap

Splitting the model meant that the two halves had to be glued together. A metal chopstick was used to center the cap. The chopstick’s diameter and rounded tip allowed it to align the two halves.

Cap glued in place

A lid with a screw hole was also printed and a screw was inserted. The screw was inserted far enough to collide with the magnets when facing north or south but the spinner would not reach the screw when facing any other direction. The screw was replaced with a bolt so it could be adjusted more finely.

Compass assembled with screw

Compass assembled with bolt

To do:
  • Lengthen screw hole collar
  • Change sphere to cone
  • Key to hold spinner top to bottom
  • Add shroud to enclose spinner
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-27 (Su)

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

2015-12-28 (M) ESPeri.Impass

The models were updated to reflect the necessary changes. The sphere on the underside of the lid was printed 50% larger to increase the clearance between the spinner and the upper limit. Most notably a groove was printed in the top of the spinner. The groove was to provide clearance for a screw coming through the lid. In the past the screw was going to come through the bottom.

Old prints on left, new prints on right

Since the groove was being printed in the top of the spinner support material had to be printed as well. This material needed to be removed after printing but left an unusable surface. This surface could probably have been salvaged by grinding it out with a tool.

Removing printer remnants from spinner

A close up picture of the rough texture was taken. Since this groove was meant to smoothly pass under a screw or bolt the surface should have been very smooth.

Rough texture of spinner groove

To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize
The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-26 (Sa)

Monday, December 28, 2015

2015-12-27 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

All the printed components were assembled. Long #6 (4mm) bolts and nuts were purchased to install in the bolt holes to erect a cage. Nuts were arranged to hold the lid at a precise distance above the bottom. This distance was enough to give the spinner space and allow it to rock back and forth when it faced north or south. In addition, the hemisphere on the lid kept the

Assembled spinner sitting on car dash

The assembled unit was carried for an entire day which had a lot of walking. No haptic feedback was expected or received but the unit served as a conversation piece. The black/orange/brass look and moving parts intrigued peoples' attentions. There was a lengthy conversation with a physics teacher who enjoyed the thought exercise. Carrying the device and playing with it in a pocket helped to stimulate thoughts for the next phase. The movement is good enough to go ahead with the feedback portion which will be a new lid with a larger hemisphere and a screw hole so a metal screw can impact the metal magnets. The next revision of the spinner will also have a groove in the top so the protruding screw can pass around the spinner. Previously the thinking was to put the groove in the bottom but the top seemed the obvious choice after carrying it for a day.


To do:
  • Make handheld haptic compass
  • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
  • Miniaturize

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-26 (Sa)

Sunday, December 27, 2015

2015-12-26 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

A full set of components were printed. Two bases were printed. One of the bases had a hollow shaft which was meant to house a long brass screw. The sharp metal tip of the screw should have provided a pivot point with less friction. Unfortunately the screw split the fragile post. A bare screw wouldn't work in this case due to the specialized. A base which needed no additional parts was printed and had low enough friction between the post and spinner to allow easy rotation.

Full set of printed components

Spinner, with magnets, spinning freely on the printed base

Mounting bolt holes were printed too close to the hub and offered no clearance between the spinner and the bolts used to hold the lid in place. Clearances for the magnets was also too low so the magnets would not fit into the pockets printed for them. During modeling it was noticed that one of the tolerances was being added when it should have been subtracting. This error was corrected so the next print will have some of the problems fixed.

Newest spinner on right next to a base with widened bolt holes


To do:
  • Optional:
      • Add compass rose to spinner
    • Make handheld haptic compass
    • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
    • Miniaturize

    The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

    First time here?

    Completed projects from year 1.
    Completed projects from year 2



    This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

    All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

    All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

    Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

    This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

    2015-12-24 (Th)

    Saturday, December 26, 2015

    2015-12-25 (F) Weekly Summary

    This was a busy week for the haptic compass. Lots of revisions but I also feel like it has been a productive week. A second option was explored right after last week's summary. Instead of a flat compass like you would find in a hiker's breast pocket this was based on a spherical compass you would find hanging off a zipper pull or suction cupped to a car dashboard. The simple premise was that this model would be suspended in a liquid and then weighted for neutral buoyancy. Embedded  magnets would cause the spiney/finned ball to point north and a small pin on the enclosure would cause collisions when the wearer was pointed north. These collisions should be felt by wearers to alert them they are facing north. This model has not been given much work aside from a rendering. The rest of the work this week was done on the cylindrical model. Although that model is looking more spherical by the day.

     Spherical spinner

    The rest of the week was spent modeling, printing, and testing the cylindrical version. Without going into detail, which can all be found in the daily posts, the spinner was the focus of the week. The goal was a spinner with a specially shaped socket and a base with a corresponding shaped post. When the spinner faced the desired direction, north, the spinner could rock back and forth with a lot of freedom. If the spinner was facing any other direction that rocking motion would be extremely limited. This rocking motion should be a huge factor in making a haptic compass.

    Advanced model of the cylindrical spinner

    There were all kinds of problems with the program I was writing in OpenSCAD. Printer tolerances were not applied correctly. Measurements were not used uniformly. Scaling would occur in one place and not another so pieces would bind up or fit too loosely. The biggest problem was the junction of the post and the spinner. This was meant to be a precise joint with tight tolerances. Instead it was sloppy and the pieces refused to fit. A test base was printed in the hopes of finding a base piece which would interact properly with the spinner. Four different posts were printed, each was printed with larger dimensions than all the bases printed before. This test base was not meant to be part of the final product, only a way to see what was necessary and test the usability of the design.

    Test base with four different sized posts

    A video was shot of a successful test which proved the compass could be designed to rock back and forth when facing a particular direction but not when it facing another direction. This has been the hardest part of this project and is what caused this project to fall on its face months ago. So, no matter what happens, this hasn't been fruitless.

    Video showing the difference in rocking when facing two different directions

    With the success shown in the video I tried to put a groove in the bottom of the spinner so a metal bump could be installed in the base. This would have been a brass screw. The metal bump would collide with the metal magnets when the spinner and base both faced north. Spaghetti code finally caught up with me because the base and spinner did not act the same way they did in the video even though they should have been exactly the same. Tolerances between the post and spinner allowed the spinner to freely rotate but it would not rock back and forth when facing north.

     Spinner with groove

    Base with hole to insert metal bump

    Unusable tolerance between spinner and the test base

    During a day I didn't have to work I started a new OpenSCAD program from line one. All new code was written with the mental image of what the spinner SHOULD look like instead of patching together more spaghetti code. The result was 25% shorter and easier to follow. All measurements were based on the idea that the origin (0,0,0) was the pivot point so making an animation where a cutaway section of the spinner rotated around the base was easy.




    The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

    First time here?

    Completed projects from year 1
    Completed projects from year 2


     

    Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

    This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

    All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

    All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

    Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

    This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

    Friday, December 25, 2015

    2015-12-24 (Th) ESPeri.Impass

    What a busy day. I didn't have work today so I bit off a big job and even got it done. In the morning I started a blank OpenSCAD document and by dinner time I had rendered four shapes for the compass. From scratch and an idea of what I wanted based on the previous model. The old one was mostly a tangle of patches and quick fixes. It wasn't optimized and bad code had been piled on top of questionable code. Sure, it compiled, but it was spaghetti. This code had 16 variables declared at the beginning and those were used instead of trying to remember how much I divided by or when I added a printerError distance to a measurement. This should allow for changes to be done much more smoothly in the future.

    An important step in making something is to imagine yourself USING it. I am far from a User Experience Engineer but I have imagination. Something occurred to me that should have been obvious, a haptic compass could be useful to people with vision impairment. It may be possible to build in an adjustment so any desired angle could be tuned with a dial and the user could walk in a straight line. This may be a solution with no problem but it would not be a costly device. Adjustability would not be an option on an implantable version.

    Enough background
    ----------

    New code was written to replace the previous models which had seen numerous updates. Code was written with the mindset of having a large array of appropriately named variables rather than subtle changes throughout the code.

    The previous code was 256 lines while the new code, written in a day, was 190 lines for a 25% decrease. Models rendered with this code were similar to the previous but had smoother transitions between components and were most noticeable on the spinner.

    Walls around the base were eliminated to save plastic but will be added when the printed models have been shown to be usable. Included in this code was a lid which was meant to keep the spinner in place even if the compass was to be turned up-side-down. This will be an important factor when making a handheld version.

    A second base was made with a hollow post so a long #6 screw could be inserted. The tip, a simple cone on the normal model, was removed so the screw tip would poke out and provide a metal tip instead of relatively soft plastic. This is a way to test for excessive plastic-on-plastic friction.

    Animations were made of each piece. The final animation shows a cutaway view of the spinner rotating around the standard base. Rendering was shown with printer error so the shaft and spinner have a gap between them.

     Standard base

     Hollow shaft base

     Spinner

     Lid

     All four models in printing software

    Spinning model with cutaway view of spinner to show movement on base

    Printed copies

    To do:
    • Optional:
        • Add compass rose to spinner
      • Remodel spinner as simpler shapes
        • Sphere
        • Pivot at center
        • Keyed bottom hole
        • Magnet pockets in bottom half
      • Compare code of original to updated 
      • Make handheld haptic compass
      • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
      • Miniaturize

      The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

      First time here?

      Completed projects from year 1.
      Completed projects from year 2



      This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

      All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

      All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

      Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

      This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

      2015-12-23 (W)

      Thursday, December 24, 2015

      2015-12-23 (W) ESPeri.Impass

      Yesterday's models were printed and the prints looked accurate and precise but the clearance between the spinner and base was not enough to allow proper wobbling when facing north/south. Yesterday the idea was brought up to simplify the model. While thinking about this idea it seemed obvious to model the socket in the spinner and the post on the base as a single function in OpenSCAD. The gap between them would be achieved by scaling the size up or down according to a single variable.

      Taking the long road to find a usable design only to completely erase the code and start again doesn't seem silly since the concept was proven in the video which shows wobbling when facing north. The design developed naturally and was hastened by 3D printing.

       Almost no clearance when facing east/west

      Binding, but some clearance, when facing north/south

      Spinning on base. For. Ever.

      A sketch was made illustrating the basic shapes in the spinner socket and post. There would be three shapes.

      • The cone at the top which would become the pivot point at the tip. 
      • The cylinder below the cone which would become the post.
      • The cuboid which would become the keyed shape in the spinner socket.


      Sketch of shapes for simplified compass model

      To do:
      • Optional:
          • Add compass rose to spinner
        • Remodel spinner as simpler shapes
          • Sphere
          • Pivot at center
          • Keyed bottom hole
          • Magnet pockets in bottom half
        • Compare code of original to updated 
        • Make handheld haptic compass
        • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
        • Miniaturize

        The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1.
        Completed projects from year 2



        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

        2015-12-22 (Tu)

        Wednesday, December 23, 2015

        2015-12-22 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

        Only a minor change was done to the spinner. A groove was removed from the bottom. Its purpose was to allow a screw, protruding from below, to pass under the spinner as it rotated. When the spinner faced north the wobbling effect would allow for a metal-on-metal collision between the screw and magnet. Currently the metal-on-metal collision will also take place when facing south.

        Rotating view of spinner model

        The base received three changes. The first change was to make the central post identical to the test base which make wobbling on at the poles possible. Secondly, a hole was added to add a brass screw through the bottom. A screw will be used so the height can be adjusted while testing. The last change was to add fastening holes around the outside so a top can be modeled later and enclose the entire project.

        Rotating view of base model

        To do:
        • Optional:
          • Add compass rose to spinner
        • Remodel spinner as simpler shapes
          • Sphere
          • Pivot at center
          • Keyed bottom hole
          • Magnet pockets in bottom half
        • Compare code of original to updated
        • Add “keyed” features to only allow slop when facing north
        • Make handheld haptic compass
        • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
        • Miniaturize

        The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1.
        Completed projects from year 2



        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

        2015-12-21 (M)

        Tuesday, December 22, 2015

        2015-12-21 (M) ESPeri.Impass

        A base was modeled to provide different keyed posts for testing the keyed spinner. All the keyed posts modeled previously were so small that they would not create significant differences in the wobbling no matter which direction the compass pointed. A hole in the center was also printed to test an ordinary #4 brass screw. Each test post was spaced to provide enough room for unimpeded movement.

        Base printed to test different pivot dimensions

        Video was taken with narration to show the change in movement while the compass spinner pointed in different directions.


        Narrated video demonstration

        To do:
        • Optional:
          • Add compass rose to spinner
          • Add holes to reduce plastic
        • Add “keyed” features to only allow slop when facing north
        • Make handheld haptic compass
        • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
        • Miniaturize

        The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1.
        Completed projects from year 2



        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

        2015-12-20 (Su)

        Monday, December 21, 2015

        2015-12-20 (Su) ESPeri.Impass

        Revisions to the compass spinner model fixed problems but old ones reappeared. Lowering the pivot point made a smaller device but the stability was gone and the spinner would not sit horizontally. A version was printed where the pivot point was raised and it created a cone shaped protrusion on the top of the spinner. It was printed with supports but the print would not come out well.

        Errors in spinner print

        Recent revisions raised the pivot point and filled in the area above the spinner so it would print solidly. This design relied on the weight of the magnets to offset the weight of the semi-hollow plastic above the pivot point. The pivot point was also made as a sharp point again.

        Spinner with cap to print level and lower magnets below pivot point

        Video was shot to demonstrate the effectiveness of the compass. A simple base, with no effective post shaping, was set down and the spinner was allowed to rest before the video was shot. Narration explains that the spinner was given enough force to spin freely and demonstrate low friction movement. The compass comes to a rest at the same direction as the starting direction.

        Video demonstration of compass spinning and returning to north


        To do:
        • Optional:
          • Add compass rose to spinner
          • Add holes to reduce plastic
        • Add “keyed” features to only allow slop when facing north
        • Make handheld haptic compass
        • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
        • Miniaturize

        The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1.
        Completed projects from year 2



        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

        2015-12-20 (Su)

        Sunday, December 20, 2015

        2015-12-19 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

        I’ve had numerous sources of inspiration for this project. Sometimes ideas don’t pan out, so far none of them have, and they get discarded. Sometimes they pop back up. I was toying with the idea of a spherical compass, like those found on keychains where you have a clear plastic sphere and inside is a spherical compass spinner which is weighted to stay upright and magnetized to point north. No matter what angle you hold this keychain it will point north. I suppose you could stand in a centrifuge and it wouldn’t point north but now you are just being persnickety.

        The way I want this compass to work is to create a spherical container with a single protrusion on the inside facing north. The spinner will have protrusions to keep the sphere centered in the container but these protrusions will have a much higher likelihood of intersecting the enclosure’s protrusion when the container is facing north.

        There was no reason the majority of protrusions were on the spinner. They could have been placed on the inside of the enclosure instead. The spherical spinner would be suspended in a liquid, probably alcohol or salt water. Fins on the spinner would create drag through the liquid as it spins. This resistance could dampen erratic movements or impede response. If the fins were placed on the enclosure and the spinner had a single protrusion disruptive currents would be generated when the user turned. More consideration will be necessary.

        Enough background.
        ----------

        A new spinner and enclosure style was conceptualized. Describing the shape was difficult so a model was produced quickly.

        Modeling was done to create a spherical compass spinner in OpenSCAD. Protrusions were modeled on the spinner rather than the enclosure. An image was created which shows the full sphere but it has been modeled in identical halves. The bottom half will have space for one or two magnets. Each half will print with the cut line on the printer platen. It may be beneficial to divide the sphere into quadrants so the protrusions print more reliably.

        Space will have to be created in the bottom half of the mode which will allow magnets to rest. A socket for a brass screw will also have to be made in the top and bottom. The screw will hold the halves together. A central screw could be used but the magnetic media could no pass through the center, for example if a rectangular bar was used. Instead, two disc magnets could be used like with the previous model. To use a single bar through the middle of the spinner two screws would have to be put on either side of the compass. A central screw will likely be used to use the magnets in stock.


        Spinning model of spherical compass spinner

        To do:
        • Optional:
          • Add compass rose to spinner
          • Add holes to reduce plastic
        • Add “keyed” features to only allow slop when facing north
        • Make handheld haptic compass
        • Make compass work from pocket or necklace
        • Miniaturize

        The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1.
        Completed projects from year 2



        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

        2015-12-16 (W)

        Saturday, December 19, 2015

        2015-12-18 (F) Weekly Summary

        l normally write my blog posts in third person with the exception of my Friday Summaries which are written, you guessed it, in first person. My blog posts are past tense but my Friday Summaries jump from present tense to past tense. These summaries can come close to one thousand words so I try to take them casually or I will burn myself out for the rest of the day. Plus, they are written in a vernacular tone and much less objective.

        This week I did some creative writing which is a different than writing this blog. It is a nice change of pace to sit at a keyboard and type without referring to phone pictures and searching for relevant links. I am not a great story teller but I enjoy this and it makes me feel productive.

        Also, I made a silly graphic. I am not a designer in case you couldn’t tell.

        I made it myself. Can you tell?

        On a more serious note I started working on the implantable compass again. This project has been through more failed iterations than any other project. By a lot. The 3D printer streamlined the process of repeated failures. Each time I get ideas on how to build the next one better or my mind goes off on a different route. I know this can become a real thing but I also have to design one with my level of tech and production abilities.

        This time a plan was laid out. They are vague because they have to be but it still breaks up the end goal. The first step, which I haven’t done in any previous version, will be to produce a haptic compass. A haptic compass will be one which can relay heading information through touch. This is not a novel idea, the Northpaw does this with eight vibrating motors and is a GREAT example of wearable technology. But it takes batteries and I want to make one that is purely mechanical.

        Each revision corrects at least one problem with the previous version or is a step toward a working model. The first three spinners just act like a compass, they don’t have any other purpose other than to make sure that I was making a workable compass. The last two have a special base so they, hopefully, don’t wobble unless they face north. This wobbling will be, hopefully, be what causes a different sensation while facing north.

        Pen sketch of spinner idea

        Model based on pen sketch. Hollow bottom

        Revised for conical/solid bottom

        Outside edge was made smooth

        Keyed bottom instead of simple cone. Rounded edges to allow wobbling

        Conical top again to avoid toppling. Larger magnets

        Two halves of printed compass

        Both halves together

        The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

        First time here?

        Completed projects from year 1
        Completed projects from year 2


         

        Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

        This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

        All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

        All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

        Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

        This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.