Monday, February 29, 2016

2016-02-28 (Su) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

The joints made yesterday were attached as hanging pieces. This seemed the most logical way to attach them since gravity and pedaling pressure would push them down. This was a secure method of attaching the pieces but the upper frame was still too low and could allow the pedals to interfere with the front wheel.

Joints attached to upper frame

All bolts were loosened and the joint was spun 180º so the upper frame would point up more than before. Clearance between the pedals and wheel was increased, hopefully enough to clear feet from the wheel.

Joints attached upside-down for elevation

Hardware wasn’t aligned properly so the upper frame was not pointed correctly. Washers had to be added to hold the frames parallel. The washers helped but added distance between the bike frames. This wasn’t a problem for leg clearance.

Upper frame not parallel to lower frame

Distance between the bike frames lead to a small problem with the short threaded rods being used. They were too short to reach between the fastening hardware on each side. This can be quickly solved with long threaded rods or, most likely, trimmed bolts.

Threaded rod too short

To do:
  • Permanently attach upper frame
  • Remove cranks from lower bike
  • Run chain between cranks and wheel
  • Construct idler sprocket
  • Test
  • Strip pink paint
  • Repaint

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-28 (Su)

Sunday, February 28, 2016

2016-02-27 (Sa) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

Two steel strips were cut to act as hangers. The intention was to drill a 3/8" hole in the top portion for the clamps mounted on the bike frame. Below that hole a smaller hole would be drilled to hold a heavy-gauge single-hole strap. Two hole straps at all the hardware stores were much thinner metal or they would have been used. After the strips were cut from a long bar the edges were smoothed.

Metal strips with strap and 3/8" rod where their holes would go

After thinking about the likelihood of a single strap and a single mounting hole it seemed probable that the whole arrangement could twist and the bike frame could dislodge. This would not be a problem with two-hole straps. Metal strips were cut from a heavier steel bar which had enough room for two straps on each.

Metal strips with room for two straps

Holes were drilled in the metal strips so the strap mounting holes and the larger hole 3/8" were all on the same line. At first the intention was to mount the straps below the 3/8" but clearance between the pedals and the wheel could be a problem so they were drilled close to one another.

Finished metal plates with holes

To do:
  • Permanently attach upper frame
  • Remove cranks from lower bike
  • Run chain between cranks and wheel
  • Construct idler sprocket
  • Test
  • Strip pink paint
  • Repaint

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-27 (Sa)

Saturday, February 27, 2016

2016-02-26 (F) Weekly Summary

Deconstruction of one bike was necessary and that was mostly done last week. Some parts still need trimming but DEconstruction is done. CONstruction was started by building a seat. The seat doesn’t really seem like the logical place to start, more of a detail, but when it comes to determining the positions of the handlebars and pedals the seat should already be in place so there is a starting point. The first attempt at a seat was PVC tubes on 1/4" (18.75mm) threaded rods. The shape was good but the rods were too flexible. Larger rods would have gotten heavy so the design was scrapped.

Failed seat materials

The next day a design was sketched out for a wooden seat and parts were purchased. The design relied on some metal parts for reinforcement but was really just a couple slabs of wood holding dowels.

Sketch for wooden seat design

Angle braces were purchased to make a seat bracket. The brackets were arranged so they would tighten on a 1/4" (20mm would work well) rod which could be clamped by the seat post.

Flat seat bracket made from angle braces

Some ordinary 1x2 lumber and dowels were purchased along with some foam padding which would fit over the dowels. The wood was all cut to length according to the sketch and the hardware was used to assemble everything into a seat that kind of looked like lawn furniture. This model was significantly stronger than the PVC version.

Wooden bike seat

Hardware for attaching the bike frames was lost so new hardware had to be purchased. Hardware for attaching the upper frame had not been purchased at all. Two analogs, things with the same diameter, were picked up around my apartment and brought to the store so I could find clamps that would fit.

Store purchases next to analogs

Purchased hardware was attached to the bike frames and fit well. The bikes frames were laid on their sides and the hardware pieces were attached so the frames could be arranged into a ridable configuration. Nothing was tightened yet.

Arrangement of hardware for attaching bike frames

The seat was attached to the bike and the pedal arrangement was checked. It fit well and was reasonably comfortable. The seat would not be suitable for long periods but it can be covered with ordinary cushions. The upper bike frame was held in place with twine for this test. Twine is not part of the final design. Shocking I know.

Sitting on bike while upper frame is suspended by twine

Attaching the old wheel sockets was not a problem but attaching the rest of the frame has proven difficult. Again, it is important to me that the frame doesn’t get drilled because holes would weaken it and considerable force may be applied through these tubes. Wide braces were purchased with the hope of connecting the frames together. This hardware didn’t work. The frames were not firm, they would wobble.

Attempt to use wide brace and cable clamp

More care will have to be taken when arranging the pedals for final installation. If the pedals are too low they will interfere with the front wheel.

Pedals will interfere with wheel


A rare unicorn picture

The rest of the weekly summaries have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1
Completed projects from year 2


 

Disclaimer for http://24hourengineer.blogspot.com/

This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, February 26, 2016

2016-02-25 (Th) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

Wide braces were purchased to accept a 3/8” hole for the hanger and the 1/4” hole for the beam clamp. Slender braces would have been weakened too much by drilling a 3/8” hole.

 Package for wide braces

There was ample metal after drilling into the brace. It got hot when the bit dulled but the hole was fine and the back side, which had remnants of the drilling, was ground down to a flush surface.

 Brace drilled with 3/8” hole

Beam clamps would not align with the clamp then single-hole cable clamps were used. They were able to attach but they were not sturdy. These clamps were easy to attach but they will not work because they are too flimsy.

 Upper frame attached with cable clamps, side view

 Upper frame attached with cable clamps, top view

When the upper frame was attached it was easy to see that the pedals could easily hit the wheel below. This will have to be raised several inches so feet and pants aren’t touching the wheel while turning. The upper frame bars, which previously made it look like a unicorn, were trimmed off to make transportation easier.

Pedal hitting tire and trimmed bars

To do:
  • Permanently attach upper frame
  • Remove cranks from lower bike
  • Run chain between cranks and wheel
  • Construct idler sprocket
  • Test
  • Strip pink paint
  • Repaint

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-18 (Th)

Thursday, February 25, 2016

2016-02-24 (W) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

The hardware store had 3/8-16 bolts but the shortest size was 1”. While at the store it was assumed this would be too long so threaded rod segments and nylon insert locknuts were purchased. The threaded rod segments were more expensive than bolts, nearly double the cost, but they offer the advantage of adjusting to exactly the right length. They can reach through the hanger socket to touch the lower bike frame and the locknut can be tightened on top of the upper frame’s wheel hub.

 Hardware store purchases

The seat was attached to the lower frame. Natural wood color next to the garish bike frame looked like lawn furniture on skating rink. When the frame is painted at the last step the seat will also have to be painted.

 Seat attached to bike

Attaching the upper frame to the lower frame was as difficult as feared. The wheel hubs attached easily to the clamps, which was a relief, but the small tubes toward the front of the frame were not attached yet. Padded single-hole cable clamps were purchased to attach but the hole in them is not 3/8” and drilling a larger hole would likely weaken them too much.

 Sprocket and cranks attached to bike

Jute twine was used to temporarily hold the upper frame in position. It was easy to get an idea of how riding would feel. Pedal distance seemed acceptable after the first adjustment. Replacing the handlebars will be necessary, as suspected. If the handlebars can be reused the post going front the frame to the handlebars will need to be changed.

Sitting on bike in riding position

To do:
  • Buy 3/8” bolts
  • Attach and adjust seat
  • Attach bike frames together
    • Adjust length to suit legs
    • Add longer bolts to touch frame
    • Threaded rod and acorn nuts?
    • Cut threads from one side of each clamp half?
  • Remove cranks from lower bike
  • Run chain between cranks and wheel
  • Construct idler sprocket
  • Test
  • Strip pink paint
  • Repaint

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-18 (Th)

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

2016-02-23 (Tu) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

All clamps had been lost so measurements were taken to replace them. Measurements were taken from the widest part of the bike frame. A second measurement was taken on the salvaged frame to find the diameter of pipe which was smaller. In order to the correct size of clamps at the hardware store some analogs were found around the apartment which had approximately the same diameter. An empty roll of clear plastic tape had almost the exact same diameter as the large bike tube. Some scrap ¾” wooden dowels had the same diameter as the other bike frame part. These analogs made it easy to find the correct clamp sizes at the hardware store.

Measuring top bar of frame

Measuring support strut

Analogs and their corresponding clamps

Four large clamps, 1” IPS, were purchased and some ¾” single hole straps with rubber padding were bought as a pair. All four IPS clamps were opened and the side without a hanger socket was discarded. The hanger socket was a 3/8” threaded hole and also had threaded holes on the wings. These four halves were assembled into two clamps with a hanger socket on each side and put on the bike frame.

Clamps on bike, left side

Clamps on bike, right side

Hopefully the clamps closest to the seat will connect with the salvaged frame’s wheel slots and hold it securely. The clamps closest to the handlebars should connect to the single hole straps which will hold the smaller pipe on each side. Clamp locations shown are not final. The position of the pedals will have to be measured when the seat is attached and adjusted for leg length.

Position of second bike parts

To do:
  • Buy 3/8” bolts
  • Attach and adjust seat
  • Attach bike frames together
    • Adjust length to suit legs
    • Add longer bolts to touch frame
    • Threaded rod and acorn nuts?
    • Cut threads from one side of each clamp half?
  • Remove cranks from lower bike
  • Run chain between cranks and wheel
  • Construct idler sprocket
  • Test
  • Strip pink paint
  • Repaint

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2016-02-16 (Tu)

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

2016-02-22 (M) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

Both of the 1x2 sets constructed yesterday were screwed in place on the 1x4 base. The 1x2 sets were the two pieces of 1x2 attached at a right angle. The 1x4 base had a bike seat post attached to it. The 1x4 base should take the majority of the rider’s weight and the 1x2 sets will provide support.

Position of base 1x4 and connected 1x2s

Brackets and base connected with screws

Wooden dowels were attached between the 1x2 sets. These were placed by predrilling though the 1x2s and drilling the center of the dowels. No exact measurements were taken for these steps since this should not need to be an exacting process. Comfort of this seat will be minimalistic in line with the scope of this bike. Perhaps a future project will be to build a comfortable recumbent bike seat.

Seat assembled with dowels

Stocked screws were too long and came out the far side of the lumber when the 1x2 sets and 1x4 base were attached. These sharp burrs were cut flush to the wood with an angle grinder. Any tool capable of cutting flush to the wood should be sufficient.

Grinding off exposed screw tips

Padded sleeves were put over the wooden dowels. This padding was similar to padding used to insulate hot water pipes. Foam padding used on exercise equipment could also work if the base was similarly padded and dimensions expanded if the padding was large.

Padding added to dowels

Close up of padding over dowel

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-21 (M)

Monday, February 22, 2016

2016-02-21 (Su) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

Two designs were sketched for creating a bike seat from ordinary lumber. Both designs relied on using 2x2 lumber which was not readily available. Instead 1x2 lumber was purchased and a design similar to the sketches was used.

Design sketch 1


Design sketch 2

Four 1x2s were cut. Two were cut to 6” (15.25cm) and two were cut to 8” (20.25cm). These dimensions were approximate and based on body shape and scale. Fitting for using Imperial units. Each pair was fastened together using an angled bracket with four 3/4” (20mm) screws and a long, 2” (50mm), screw. This was repeated for the other pair of 1x2s.

Angled pieces of 1x2

An adapter was made to go between the seat post bracket and a flat wooden plank. This adapter used the same angle brackets used to reinforce the 1x2s. The adapter was meant to provide a flat plane where screws could go through into a flat board and hold a pair of 1/4" (6.5mm or 7mm) threaded rods parallel to the plane.

Seat post adapters

Holding seat post adapter

Seat post connected to adapter

1x6 lumber was cut to go between the wooden brackets. This feature was similar to the sketched designs.

Seat post connected to 1x4

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-20 (Su)

Sunday, February 21, 2016

2016-02-20 (Sa) Simple Recumbent Bike Without Welding

Making a comfortable seat is going to be important. I couldn’t find much information about buying a seat for recumbent bikes, it looks like those have not been standardized like bike saddles. Yes, they’re legitimately called saddles.

One of the big differences between traditional bikes, diamond frame, and recumbent bikes is where weight is distributed. On a diamond frame the rider’s weight is on the pedals, handlebars, and the saddle. When I rode in the MS150 I learned just how much weight is put onto the seat, in fact, our team name was “No ifs, ands, sore butts, about it.” Sadly, we didn’t win the Most Creative Team Name Competition. On a recumbent bike nearly all the rider’s weight is on the seat is on the seat but fortunately the area is much greater so it is significantly more comfortable compared to a diamond frame.

I think I can keep this project under $50, so long as thrift stores are utilized, and making the seat for cheap is important. I’m not concerned if my bill goes over $50 but if I can keep the final bill of materials small and cheap I will be pleased. Salvaging existing bike parts will be one way to keep the cost low. Building from scratch is also fine but time consuming.

Spoiler: today I made a time gamble on a seat design I thought would be cool and easy to reproduce but turned out to be flimsy. Too flimsy. Unless the rider weighed 20lbs. Basically, I made a lightweight luggage rack. Bummer. Time gamble: lost. The premise was that I would make an array of parallel PVC pipes then coat them in foam, like pool noodles, and it would be a relatively comfortable seat. Had I made it out of strong materials it might work but that sounds expensive.

Enough background.
----------

A bolt at the junction of the bike frame and seat post was loosened and the seat and post from the youth bike was removed. The seat was removed from the post by loosening a pair of nuts on either side of the adapter.

Seat post being loosened by wrench

Bars running under the seat which connect to the adapter were measured at approximately 7mm (1/4”) diameter. 1/4-20 threaded rod was purchased to connect here. By using the existing hardware less severe modifications were necessary. Simple modifications make the project easier to copy. Standard parts do the same and this project is meant to be accessible. Threaded rods were fit into the seat post adapter and fit snugly once tightened.

1/4-20 threaded rod held in seat post hardware

Material was cut for the seat. Five lengths of PVC were cut to 16” (40cm) and four lengths of threaded rod were cut to 12” (30cm). These measurements should not have to be exact but the pieces should be uniform.

Five lengths of 16” (40cm) 3/4” PVC and four 12” (30cm) segments of threaded rod

Two lengths of the threaded rod were fastened into the seat post adapter and aligned. This ensured the rods were the correct distance apart while in use. This distance was transferred to the PVC pipes so parallel holes could be drilled.

Threaded rod segments in seat post bracket

Holes were drilled into the PVC. Pipes were held in place on a drill press by laying them in grooved piece of wood which simply ensured the drill bit would pass through the center of the pipe and the exit hole would be right across from the entry hole.

PVC drilled to fit onto threaded rod

Making threaded rods meet at 90º wasn’t easy. Two angle brackets were fastened together to form each junction. One short bolt and seven nuts were necessary for each. Junction. This made for a rigid joint but it was large and costly.

Brackets made from pairs of angle braces

All the parts were assembled. Each piece of PVC was placed on the threaded rod and nuts held them in place. Nuts were not tightened securely for this phase, only snugged to keep the PVC in place. No padding was purchased since this was only to test the design. Unfortunately the seat was not rigid enough to support a person. Another method will have to be found.

Assembled seat

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

First time here?

Completed projects from year 1.
Completed projects from year 2



This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2015-12-09 (W)